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Judge dismisses lawsuit against Trump over Emoluments Clause

Judge dismisses lawsuit against Trump over Emoluments Clause
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A federal judge on Thursday dismissed a lawsuit from a liberal watchdog organization arguing President TrumpDonald TrumpRomney blasts end of filibuster, expansion of SCOTUS McConnell, GOP slam Biden's executive order on SCOTUS US raises concerns about Iran's seriousness in nuclear talks MORE is violating the Emoluments Clause of the Constitution by paying foreign governments.

Judge George Daniels dismissed the case on “lack of standing,” agreeing with Trump’s lawyers’ argument that the claims do not fall within the interests of the Emoluments Clause, and should be resolved through the “political process," according to the ruling.

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Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington (CREW) filed a lawsuit earlier this year claiming that because Trump has not fully divested from his businesses, he is receiving “cash and favors from foreign governments, through guests and events at his hotels, leases in his buildings, and valuable real estate deals abroad.” 

As a result, the group argued, Trump was in violation of the Emoluments Clause, which prevents elected officials from receiving gifts or benefits from foreign governments without Congress’s approval.

“While today’s ruling is a setback, we will not walk away from this serious and ongoing constitutional violation. The Constitution is explicit on these issues, and the president is clearly in violation,” CREW said Thursday in a statement.

“We respectfully disagree with the district court’s decision. There is no question that there will be an appeal, and our legal team is in the process of exploring our next steps," said Deepak Gupta, the counsel for the plaintiffs.

Trump’s lawyers moved to dismiss the case in September.

Trump has said his business interests will be put in a blind trust and managed by his sons, Donald Trump Jr.Don TrumpTrump Jr. shares edited video showing father knocking Biden down with golf ball Trump: 'I can't imagine' any Republican would beat me in 2024 primary if I run Trump Jr.: There are 'plenty' of GOP incumbents who should be challenged MORE and Eric TrumpEric TrumpHunter Biden blasts Trump in new book: 'A vile man with a vile mission' Sunday shows preview: Spotlight on Georgia voting law; lawmakers tackle gun violence, border surge Chicago hospital exec resigns after improper Trump Tower vaccine distribution MORE.

Critics and watchdog groups have expressed concern that foreign officials can patronize Trump’s businesses to curry favor with the president.

Updated: 6:34 p.m.