SPONSORED:

Trump offers Kwanzaa greetings

Trump offers Kwanzaa greetings
© Getty Images

For President TrumpDonald TrumpGOP-led Maricopa County board decries election recount a 'sham' Analysis: Arpaio immigration patrol lawsuit to cost Arizona county at least 2 million Conservatives launch 'anti-cancel culture' advocacy organization MORE, it’s time to say "happy Kwanzaa."

The president issued a statement Tuesday marking the beginning of the seven-day festival. 

“Today marks the first day of Kwanzaa, a weeklong celebration of African American heritage and culture. Together, let us celebrate during this joyous time the richness of the past and look with hope toward a brighter future,” Trump said. 

ADVERTISEMENT

“As families and friends join to light the Kinara, Melania and I extend our warmest wishes for a joyful holiday season and a prosperous year to come,” he said.

During the holiday season, Trump has argued he made it OK to wish people a “merry Christmas” again. 

It’s a message he has used to combat what he sees as rampant political correctness. 

“People are proud to be saying Merry Christmas again. I am proud to have led the charge against the assault of our cherished and beautiful phrase. MERRY CHRISTMAS!!!!!” Trump tweeted on Christmas Eve. 

In 2011, Trump criticized then-President Obama, claiming he was downplaying Christmas.

“What a convenient mistake: @BarackObama issued a statement for Kwanza but failed to issue one for Christmas,” Trump tweeted at the time.

That year, Obama wished followers a “Merry Christmas” on his Twitter account and repeated the greeting in a holiday video with first lady Michelle ObamaMichelle LeVaughn Robinson ObamaMichelle Obama describes Barack's favorite movies: 'Everybody is sad, then they die' Michelle Obama on coping with low-grade depression: 'Nobody rides life on a high' Sarah Silverman urges Congress to pass voting bill: 'What kind of politician wants to keep people from voting?' MORE

Presidents George W. Bush and Bill ClintonWilliam (Bill) Jefferson ClintonApproving Kristen Clarke's nomination should be a no-brainer Obama calls on governments to 'do their part' in increasing global vaccine supply China's emissions now eclipse the developed world — preventing climate protection MORE also marked the Kwanzaa celebration in statements. 

Kwanzaa, which was first celebrated in 1966, culminates with a feast and gift giving. The holiday ends Jan. 1.