Trump: Nobody wants to take care of DACA more than me

President TrumpDonald TrumpJan. 6 panel plans to subpoena Trump lawyer who advised on how to overturn election Texans chairman apologizes for 'China virus' remark Biden invokes Trump in bid to boost McAuliffe ahead of Election Day MORE said Friday that he and Republicans want to find a way to extend protections for recipients of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program.

Trump said during an interview with CNBC’s Joe Kernen that “nobody wants to take care of DACA more than myself and the Republican Party.”

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“Look, we're going to try and make a deal on DACA. We have a good chance of making it. What we need is, we need the wall, we need security, we need security at the border,” Trump said.

The president unveiled his framework for an immigration bill on Thursday, requesting $25 billion largely for his promised wall on the U.S.-Mexico border and providing a pathway to citizenship for 1.8 million DACA recipients.

“These are good people, these are people that should be able to stay in this country. We're going to solve the DACA problem. But we also want to solve a tremendous problem on the southern border, which is crime,” Trump said.

The president also used the MS-13 gang, which his administration has cracked down on, to argue for stronger border security.

“They don't want to have MS-13 coming into our cities. You know how many of these people were getting out? These are horrible, horrible human beings. And they came here as horrible human beings. And Joe, it sounds terrible. They don't shoot somebody, they cut them up into little pieces because it's more painful,” Trump said.

“I don't want them — we are taking them out by the thousands. By the thousands. We don't want them coming in, but we're going to take care of DACA,” he continued.

The Trump administration announced last year that DACA, an Obama-era program that blocks certain young immigrants who were brought into the U.S. illegally when they were children from being deported, would end in March.

A standoff over a guarantee for a DACA fix led to a three-day long government shutdown earlier this month. Senate Democrats eventually struck a deal on government funding with the GOP with the promise of a larger immigration bill being taken up next month.