Dem rep: Firing Comey ‘more serious’ than wanting to fire Mueller

A Democratic lawmaker said Friday that President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump mocks wind power: 'When the wind doesn't blow, just turn off the television' Pentagon investigator probing whether acting chief boosted former employer Boeing Trump blasts McCain, bemoans not getting 'thank you' for funeral MORE's decision to fire former FBI Director James ComeyJames Brien ComeyTrump says public can see Mueller report Anderson Cooper blasts Trump over McCain attacks: 'He's punching a person who is dead' Clyburn: Trump and family 'greatest threats to democracy' in lifetime MORE over the Russia investigation was a "much more serious episode" than a report from The New York Times claiming Trump had tried to fire special counsel Robert MuellerRobert Swan MuellerSasse: US should applaud choice of Mueller to lead Russia probe MORE.

In an interview with CNN's "New Day," Rep. Jim HimesJames (Jim) Andres HimesHillicon Valley: Doctors press tech to crack down on anti-vax content | Facebook, Instagram suffer widespread outages | Spotify hits Apple with antitrust complaint | FCC rejects calls to delay 5G auction House Dem introduces bill requiring public firms to disclose cybersecurity expertise in leadership House lawmakers clash over GOP allegations Dems coached Cohen MORE (D-Conn.) said the news of Mueller's intended firing was "not surprising."

Responding to a question on whether trying to fire Mueller constitutes obstruction of justice, Himes said "no act was committed."

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"He didn't actually fire Mueller, so no act was committed. Now that takes us back to Jim Comey," Himes said. "That's, I think, a much more serious episode."

"What it does do is show intent," Himes added. "And it's not surprising. Look, this is not a subtle legal mind. I think the president sees a problem in front of him, and says 'I'm going to make this problem go away.' "

Comey was fired by Trump, who told NBC's Lester Holt that the Russia investigation was chief on his mind when he made the decision. Mueller has been investigating, among other things, whether Comey's firing amounted to obstruction of justice.

Many Democrats reacted with shock Thursday after The New York Times reported that Trump ordered White House lawyer Don McGahn to fire the special counsel in June, but that McGahn refused.

The president's critics have pointed to Mueller's firing as a "red line" that Trump couldn't cross without retribution.

Some Democrats, including Himes's fellow Connecticut lawmaker Sen. Richard Blumenthal (D), called on the Senate to take up bills aimed at protecting the special counsel from the Trump administration in the wake of the news.

"Stunning, deeply scary Trump move to fire Mueller raises need for Special Counsel protection bill immediately. Judiciary Committee must approve and Congress must pass," Blumenthal tweeted.