What Trump didn't say in his State of the Union address

President TrumpDonald John TrumpSunday shows preview: Trump sells U.N. reorganizing and Kavanaugh allegations dominate Ex-Trump staffer out at CNN amid “false and defamatory accusations” Democrats opposed to Pelosi lack challenger to topple her MORE touted a robust economy and laid out an ambitious agenda in his first State of the Union address Tuesday night, an 80-minute marathon jammed with policy proposals that will be difficult to achieve in a bitterly divided Congress.

Trump’s wish list included a $1.5 trillion infrastructure package, immigration reform and new powers to promote or fire federal workers.

But just as notable was what Trump didn’t say — and what that says about an inexperienced but emboldened politician still learning the trappings of his new office. 

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Here are eight big things that were missing from Trump’s address on Tuesday. 

Details

Trump outlined the four pillars of an immigration reform package he said should satisfy, or at least mollify, both parties — including a path to citizenship for 1.8 million immigrants brought to the country illegally as children, a wall along the southern border, the repeal of a visa lottery program and an end to so-called chain migration.

But beyond immigration, a president who has made clear his disinterest in policy minutiae offered few details. State of the Union addresses are rarely the venue for detailed policy outlines, though Trump’s address stood out for a lack of specificity.

He declared the opioid epidemic “terrible,” without offering a plan to stem the tens of thousands of deaths caused by drug overdoses every year. He called for paid family leave, a favorite subject of his daughter and senior advisor Ivanka TrumpIvana (Ivanka) Marie TrumpHard choices in training Americans for AI workplace of future Ex-Trump, progressive strategists battle over charges of anti-Semitism surrounding Eric Trump Ethics watchdog requests probe into Trump officials traveling to campaign events MORE, without detailing how or what that program would look like.

Most notably, Trump asked Congress to pass a bill to generate $1.5 trillion in new infrastructure investments. He said federal money should be bolstered by public-private partnerships, though he offered scant details about how Congress should pay for the bill.

Debt and Deficits

The Republican Party spent the Obama years focused on fiscal prudence and discipline, harshly criticizing Democrats for spending far too much on everything from a stimulus package in the depths of a recession to the Affordable Care Act.

Today, Republicans in Congress seem far less interested in the nation’s red ink. Trump himself did not use the word “debt” during his address, nor did he lay out how he would pay for the massive infrastructure spending plan. The tax-reform package Congress passed last year will only add to the bills future generations must pay off.

For the fiscally conservative GOP, the era of big deficits appears to be back.

The Affordable Care Act

Trump came to office pledging to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, his predecessor’s signature domestic policy achievement. But after a year in which the GOP failed to advance a repeal measure, or even agree on a replacement, ObamaCare barely received a mention.

“We repealed the core of disastrous ObamaCare,” Trump declared. “The individual mandate is now gone.”

Beyond the defunct mandate to have insurance, which Republicans repealed in their tax bill, Trump did not mention the Affordable Care Act. Pointedly, he did not call on Congress to try again to repeal it.

That shouldn’t be a surprise: Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellDoug Jones to McConnell: Don't 'plow right through' with Kavanaugh Kavanaugh accuser agrees to testify next week GOP, Kavanaugh accuser struggle to reach deal MORE (R-Ky.) said in December the upper chamber would “probably move on” from its efforts to roll back the health-care law.

Attacks on the election system, and the FBI

A year after the American intelligence community concluded that Russian actors tried to influence the 2016 presidential election — and tried to hack into voting systems in nearly two dozen states — Trump did not mention the cyberattacks.

He did mention Russia, once: “Around the world, we face rogue regimes, terrorist groups, and rivals like China and Russia that challenge our interests, our economies and our values,” Trump said.

He also did not mention the FBI, which his administration has battled since its first days in office. That doesn’t mean the battle is over. The House Intelligence Committee voted Monday to release a controversial memo penned by chairman Devin NunesDevin Gerald NunesRussia probe accelerates political prospects for House Intel Dems Nunes: Russia probe documents should be released before election Gowdy: House Intel panel should release all transcripts from Russia probe MORE (R-Calif.) that alleges FBI misconduct, and a forthcoming inspector general report is expected to be highly critical of the agency’s actions in the run-up to the 2016 election.

But the Sturm und Drang was absent from a speech that all but ignored the most divisive controversies of Trump’s first year in office.

Democrats

Presidents often use State of the Union addresses to single out members of the other party, especially on areas where they might agree. Former President Obama name-checked Speaker Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanHow does the 25th Amendment work? Sinema, Fitzpatrick call for long-term extension of Violence Against Women Act GOP super PAC drops .5 million on Nevada ad campaign MORE (R-Wis.) in his final State of the Union, in 2016; he mentioned Sen. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioNikki Haley: New York Times ‘knew the facts’ about curtains and still released story March For Our Lives founder leaves group, says he regrets trying to 'embarrass' Rubio Rubio unloads on Turkish chef for 'feasting' Venezuela's Maduro: 'I got pissed' MORE (R-Fla.) in 2014, and he invoked his two vanquished White House opponents, Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainTrump hits McCain on ObamaCare vote GOP, White House start playing midterm blame game Arizona race becomes Senate GOP’s ‘firewall’ MORE (R-Ariz.) and former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneyMaher makes million donation to Democratic Senate super PAC Poll: House GOP candidate leads in California swing district Super PACs spend big in high-stakes midterms MORE (R), in 2013.

Trump appealed to Democrats three times, urging Congress to come together to represent all Americans. And he gestured to some Democrats who applauded his call for paid family leave. But the president did not mention a single Democrat by name.

That’s not entirely unprecedented; Obama did not mention any Republicans during his 2015 address.

For that matter, Republicans

Trump made a special point to mention Rep. Steve ScaliseStephen (Steve) Joseph ScaliseOn The Money: Midterms to shake up House finance panel | Chamber chief says US not in trade war | Mulvaney moving CFPB unit out of DC | Conservatives frustrated over big spending bills Midterms to shake up top posts on House finance panel On The Money: Senate approves 4B spending bill | China imposes new tariffs on billion in US goods | Ross downplays new tariffs: 'Nobody's going to actually notice' MORE (R-La.), the House majority whip who survived a gunman’s assault on a congressional baseball practice last summer.

But, in a speech that highlighted a cast of characters seemingly large enough to fill half the gallery, Trump did not mention any other members of Congress.

After a year in which he publicly or privately expressed his frustrations with Attorney General Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsDem warns Trump: 'Obstruction of justice' to fire Rosenstein Donald Trump’s Rosenstein dilemma White House proposes executive order to Trump that would examine tech companies’ practices MORE, Secretary of State Rex TillersonRex Wayne TillersonSunday shows preview: Trump sells U.N. reorganizing and Kavanaugh allegations dominate Pompeo working to rebuild ties with US diplomats: report NYT says it was unfair on Haley curtain story MORE, Commerce Secretary Wilbur RossWilbur Louis RossWilbur Ross ordered to give deposition in 2020 census case: report The seafood trade deficit is a diversionary tactic Wilbur Ross is wrong; the pain from the trade war is coming MORE and former Health and Human Services Secretary Tom PriceThomas (Tom) Edmunds PriceWhite House officials discussing potential replacements for FEMA chief: report Overnight Health Care: CBO finds bill delaying parts of ObamaCare costs B | Drug CEO defends 400 percent price hike | HHS declares health emergency ahead of hurricane HHS should look into Azar's close ties to the drug industry MORE, Trump didn’t share credit with many of his own appointees, either. He spotlighted only a single member of his own Cabinet, Defense Secretary James MattisJames Norman MattisOvernight Defense: Trump identifies first soldier remains from North Korea | New cyber strategy lets US go on offense | Army chief downplays talk of 'Fort Trump' Pompeo backed continued US support in Yemen war over objections from staff: report Stand with veterans instead of predatory for-profit colleges MORE.

And Trump did not even mention the man who purportedly helped write the speech, Vice President Pence. That’s a marked departure from Obama, who made special points to mention then-Vice President Joe BidenJoseph (Joe) Robinette BidenBiden to campaign for Stacey Abrams next week Dems with political experience could have edge in 2020 primary, says pollster Ford taps Obama, Clinton alum to navigate Senate hearing MORE and his portfolio several times in each State of the Union address.

Insults and nicknames

Trump kicked off his campaign for president by denigrating Mexican immigrants as murderers and rapists. He attacked a reporter with a disability and the father of a solider killed in battle.

Along the way, he peppered his opponents and adversaries with pejorative nicknames — "Little Marco Rubio," "Liddle' Bob CorkerRobert (Bob) Phillips CorkerPoll: More voters oppose Kavanaugh’s nomination than support it Ford opens door to testifying next week Police arrest nearly two dozen Kavanaugh protesters MORE," "Crooked Hillary," "Lyin’ Ted," "Cryin’ Chuck SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerTrump, GOP regain edge in Kavanaugh battle READ: President Trump’s exclusive interview with Hill.TV The Hill's 12:30 Report — Trump slams Sessions in exclusive Hill.TV interview | Kavanaugh accuser wants FBI investigation MORE" and "Little Rocket Man," his nickname for North Korean leader Kim Jong Un.

But those insults and jibes were absent from Trump’s remarks, at least for one night.

And everything else

After trying to implement a travel ban on several Muslim-majority countries, Trump did not say the word "Muslim." He mentioned African-Americans and Hispanic-Americans just once, in the context of record-low unemployment rates.

Trump called for “fair and, very importantly, reciprocal” trade deals — though he did not mention the North American Free Trade Agreement by name.

He mentioned Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands, both of which suffered the brunt of mammoth hurricanes that barreled through the Caribbean, but he did not mention the hundreds of thousands of residents who remain without power in the islands months later.

And, perhaps most surprisingly, Trump did not touch on his favorite subject: His against-the-odds victory in the 2016 presidential election.

Perhaps those subjects will come up in a Wednesday tweet storm.