Kelly says Trump not likely to extend DACA deadline

Kelly says Trump not likely to extend DACA deadline

White House chief of staff John KellyJohn Francis KellyMORE said Tuesday that President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump fires intelligence community inspector general who flagged Ukraine whistleblower complaint Trump organization has laid off over 1000 employees due to pandemic: report Trump invokes Defense Production Act to prevent export of surgical masks, gloves MORE is unlikely to extend the deadline for work permits under the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program on March 5 if Congress has not reached a deal on immigration by that date.

Kelly told reporters on Capitol Hill that he was "not so sure" that Trump had the authority to extend the deadline because the program was not based on law, The Washington Post reported.

Work permits for DACA recipients will begin to expire on that date due to Trump's decision to rescind DACA in September with a six-month delay.

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The White House is “not so sure this president has the authority to extend it," Kelly told reporters. “I doubt very much” it would happen, he added.

"There are 690,000 official DACA recipients and the president sent over what amounts to be two and a half times that number, to 1.8 million," Kelly continued. "The difference between 690 and 1.8 million were the people that some would say were too afraid to sign up, others would say were too lazy to get off their asses, but they didn’t sign up."

On Monday, the White House rejected a bipartisan immigration plan that extended DACA protections but failed to provide the funding boost the Trump administration wants for a wall on the U.S.-Mexico border.

Trump wrote on Twitter that the deal was a non-starter, as was any bill that did not include adequate funding for the border wall.

“Any deal on DACA that does not include STRONG border security and the desperately needed WALL is a total waste of time,” he tweeted. “March 5th is rapidly approaching and the Dems seem not to care about DACA. Make a deal!”

Kelly was on Capitol Hill on Tuesday to discuss the legislative agenda with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellOvernight Health Care: CDC recommends face coverings in public | Resistance to social distancing sparks new worries | Controversy over change of national stockpile definition | McConnell signals fourth coronavirus bill On The Money: Economy sheds 701K jobs in March | Why unemployment checks could take weeks | Confusion surrounds 9B in small-business loans 13 things to know for today about coronavirus MORE (R-Ky.), according to White House legislative director Marc Short.

Short rejected the bipartisan immigration bill by Sens. Christopher CoonsChristopher (Chris) Andrew CoonsSenate includes 0M for mail-in voting in coronavirus spending deal Hillicon Valley: Facebook reports huge spike in usage during pandemic | Democrats push for mail-in voting funds in coronavirus stimulus | Trump delays deadline to acquire REAL ID Democrats press for more stimulus funding to boost mail-in voting MORE (D-Del.) and John McCainJohn Sidney McCainDemocratic super PAC targets McSally over coronavirus response GOP senator suspending campaign fundraising, donating paycheck amid coronavirus pandemic Biden's pick for vice president doesn't matter much MORE (R-Ariz.) Monday and suggested senators look to the White House framework as a basis for a bill.

“Look at our framework,” Short told reporters. “I think we’d advocate our framework to be the base bill.”