Trump sticks to script at National Prayer Breakfast

President TrumpDonald John TrumpO'Rourke: Trump driving global, U.S. economy into recession Manchin: Trump has 'golden opportunity' on gun reforms Objections to Trump's new immigration rule wildly exaggerated MORE did not stray from his prepared remarks while addressing the National Prayer Breakfast on Thursday, touting the fight against the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS) but not mentioning the budget battle consuming Congress or staff secretary Rob Porter's resignation from the White House.
 
“America is a nation of believers and together we are strengthened by the power of prayer," Trump said at the breakfast. 
 
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"Together as Americans, we are a tireless force for justice and for peace," he said. "For years ISIS had brutally murdered Christians, Jews, religious minorities and countless Muslims. Today the coalition to defeat ISIS has liberated almost 100 percent of the territory held by these killers in Iraq and all throughout Syria."
  
White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders announced staff secretary Rob Porter's resignation on Wednesday after the aide's two former wives told the Daily Mail they had gone through physical and emotional abuse during their marriages to Porter. 
 
Chief of staff John KellyJohn Francis KellyMORE, who initially defended Porter, issued a statement saying he was shocked by the claims after photos surfaced of one of the women. 
 
"I was shocked by the new allegations released today against Rob Porter. There is no place for domestic violence in our society,” Kelly said. 
 
Kelly also said he stood by his earlier comments and that he believed every person deserved a chance to defend themselves. Porter has denied the allegations, calling them "outrageous" and "simply false." 
 
The Senate is set to vote Thursday on a two-year budget deal that would significantly increase spending and suspend the debt ceiling for a year. The deal is aimed at preventing another government shutdown. 
 
While the deal is expected to pass through the Senate, it faces obstacles in the House, where Democrats are demanding a promise from Speaker Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanEmbattled Juul seeks allies in Washington Ex-Parkland students criticize Kellyanne Conway Latina leaders: 'It's a women's world more than anything' MORE (R-Wis.) to debate immigration legislation in the near future. 
 
House Minority Leader Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiObjections to Trump's new immigration rule wildly exaggerated Latest pro-democracy rally draws tens of thousands in Hong Kong Lewandowski on potential NH Senate run: If I run, 'I'm going to win' MORE (D-Calif.) spoke for hours on the House floor on Wednesday on the need to protect hundreds of thousands of immigrants brought to the United States illegally as children who had previously been shielded from deportation by the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, which Trump is ending. 
 
The legislation also faces opposition from House Republicans who are opposed to spending increases.