Trump: Why doesn't DOJ investigate Obama administration?

President TrumpDonald John TrumpRussia's election interference is a problem for the GOP Pence to pitch trade deal during trip to Michigan: report Iran oil minister: US made 'bad mistake' in ending sanctions waivers MORE is pressuring Attorney General Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsTrump poised to roll back transgender health protections Trump claims Mueller didn't speak to those 'closest' to him And the winner of the Robert Mueller Sweepstakes is — Vladimir Putin MORE to open an investigation into the Obama administration over Russian meddling in the 2016 election.

Trump took to Twitter on Wednesday to vent that Democrats are not under investigation, as special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerSasse: US should applaud choice of Mueller to lead Russia probe MORE’s probe into allegations of collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia heats up.

 

So far, Mueller has induced guilty pleas out of Trump’s former national security adviser Michael Flynn and former campaign adviser George PapadopoulosGeorge Demetrios PapadopoulosPoll: Nearly half of Republicans say no one on Trump campaign committed a crime George Papadopoulos urges Barr to investigate examples of 'spying' while he was campaign aide Ten post-Mueller questions that could turn the tables on Russia collusion investigators MORE for lying to the FBI. Both men are cooperating with the special counsel.

Trump’s former campaign chairman Paul ManafortPaul John ManafortPoll: Nearly half of Republicans say no one on Trump campaign committed a crime It is wrong to say 'no collusion' The Hill's Morning Report - Is impeachment back on the table? MORE and his associate Richard Gates face a litany of charges over alleged financial crimes. Gates is believed to be in talks about working with the special counsel to build the case against Manafort.

ADVERTISEMENT

And last week, the special counsel announced indictments against 13 Russians, exposing an alleged ring of foreign nationals who used social media platforms to sow divisions in the U.S. and undermine Democratic presidential candidate Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonTrump rips Krugman, NYT after columnist writes GOP no longer believes in American values Klobuchar jokes to Cuomo: 'I feel you creeping over my shoulder' but 'not in a Trumpian manner' Dems seek to rein in calls for impeachment MORE.

That indictment was careful to note that there is no evidence at this point to suggest that any Americans knowingly worked with the Russians.

But Trump and his allies in conservative media have been sounding the alarm for months over what they say is evidence that Democrats ignored warning signs of Russian meddling and in some cases bent the law to ensure the president and his associates would be investigated.

The Mueller indictment of the Russian internet trolls says their work predated the 2016 election, provoking Republicans to accuse the Obama administration of not taking the threat seriously enough.

That has led to a round of bickering between Trump officials and former Obama administration officials over who has been tougher on Russia.

Ned Price, a former member of Obama’s national security council, argued Tuesday on MSNBC that the Obama administration focused on preventing Russians from manipulating voter rolls and votes and that they were successful in that area.

“This is a rich line of attack coming from a president who spills secrets to the Russians in the Oval Office, who relishes time with [President Vladimir] Putin both on the phone and in person and a person who refuses to enact punitive sanctions on Moscow for its attack on our democracy,” Price said.

Democrats have hammered Trump for not yet implementing new sanctions against Russia that were passed by Congress.

White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said Tuesday that those sanctions are still under review as she defended the administration as being tough on Moscow.

“The president has been extremely tough on Russia,” she said, arguing that Trump pushed through $700 billion to rebuild the military, has “helped export energy” to Eastern Europe, arm the Ukranians and close diplomatic properties in the U.S. while upholding Obama-era sanctions there.

“There are a number of places that Obama was too weak and refused to take and put pressure on Russia, where this president has,” Sanders said.

Meanwhile, a political fight rages over the infamous dossier compiled by British spy Christopher Steele and paid for in part by Clinton’s campaign and the Democratic National Committee.

The FBI and Department of Justice used that dossier, which relied heavily on intelligence from Russian officials, in part to secure warrants to spy on Carter Page, a former Trump campaign adviser.

Republicans have alleged that law enforcement officials hid from the surveillance court the Democratic origins of the dossier.

House Intelligence Committee Chairman Devin NunesDevin Gerald NunesTrump hits Twitter: 'They don't treat me well as a Republican' Ten post-Mueller questions that could turn the tables on Russia collusion investigators Schiff, Nunes pressed DOJ for Mueller briefing MORE (R-Calif.) sent letters this week to former senior Obama administration officials demanding answers on what they knew about the dossier and when they found about it.

Conservatives have also sought to draw attention to Clinton operatives Sidney Blumenthal and Cody Shearer, who passed along their own research on Russia to a State Department official when John KerryJohn Forbes KerryOvernight Defense: Trump ends sanctions waivers for buying Iranian oil | At least four Americans killed in Sri Lanka attacks | Sanders pushes for Yemen veto override vote Overnight Energy: Trump moves to crack down on Iranian oil exports | Florida lawmakers offer bill to ban drilling off state's coast | Bloomberg donates .5M to Paris deal Trump: 'Iran is being given very bad advice by John Kerry' MORE was secretary of State.

That work got passed along to Steele, who gave it to the FBI along with his own work.