Hope Hicks tops GQ list of most powerful in Trump’s Washington

Hope Hicks tops GQ list of most powerful in Trump’s Washington
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White House communications director Hope HicksHope Charlotte HicksTrump: 'Top shows' on Fox News, cable are 'Fair (or great)' to me Trump criticizes Fox, which 'isn't working for us anymore' Sarah Huckabee Sanders becomes Fox News contributor MORE has been named the most powerful person in Washington, D.C., by GQ, the magazine's website announced Thursday.

Hicks, the 29-year-old former public relations official for Ivanka TrumpIvana (Ivanka) Marie TrumpThe Hill's Morning Report - Trump takes 2020 roadshow to New Mexico 2020 is not a family affair, for a change Katy Tur says it is 'shameful' that Congress hasn't passed new family leave law MORE's brand, took over for Anthony ScaramucciAnthony ScaramucciTrump blasts 'Mr. Tough Guy' Bolton: 'He made some very big mistakes' Trump's mental decline is perfectly clear for those with eyes to see and ears to hear Scaramucci calls Trump a 'full-blown demagogue' MORE after his short-lived stint as communications director last year. Now Hicks is one of Trump's most trusted aides and has lasted longer in the administration than many others have.

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“Hope is feared and revered in the West Wing,” White House counselor Kellyanne ConwayKellyanne Elizabeth ConwayIran: Rouhani, Trump won't meet at United Nations Trump denies reports he's willing to meet with Iran with 'no conditions' O'Rourke's debate moment reignites gun debate on Sunday shows MORE told GQ. 

“To the public, she remains in the background,” she added. “To the president, she is front and center.”

Hicks has so far avoided much of the public scrutiny faced by other White House aides, allowing her to outlast top aides to the president such as former chief of staff Reince PriebusReinhold (Reince) Richard PriebusPoliticon announces lineup including Comey, Hannity, Priebus Sunday shows - White House stresses Trump's determination in China trade fight as GOP challenger emerges Priebus: Left's 'wacko ideas' are opportunity for Republicans in 2020 MORE and former chief strategist Stephen Bannon.

Still, her proximity to Trump has ensnared her in the ongoing investigations into Russia's election interference and possible collusion between the Trump campaign and Moscow. In January, the House Intelligence Committee requested testimony from Hicks regarding her time in the Trump administration and campaign.

Hicks has also come up in the special counsel investigation headed by Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerFox's Cavuto roasts Trump over criticism of network Mueller report fades from political conversation Trump calls for probe of Obama book deal MORE.

In January, The New York Times reported that a former spokesman for President TrumpDonald John TrumpTed Cruz knocks New York Times for 'stunning' correction on Kavanaugh report US service member killed in Afghanistan Pro-Trump website edited British reality star's picture to show him wearing Trump hat MORE’s legal team, Mark CoralloMark CoralloThe 81 names targeted in Democrats' expansive Trump probe The Memo: Capitol Hill braces for Cohen fireworks The Memo: Trump allies fret as legal troubles multiply MORE, may have planned to testify that Hicks may have been plotting to obstruct justice alongside Trump by deleting emails pertaining to Donald Trump Jr.Donald (Don) John TrumpThe Hill's Morning Report - Trump takes 2020 roadshow to New Mexico 2020 is not a family affair, for a change Pompeo jokes about speaking at Trump hotel: 'The guy who owns it' is 'going to be successful' MORE's meeting with a Russian lawyer at Trump Tower.

"The idea that Hope Hicks ever suggested that emails or other documents would be concealed or destroyed is completely false,” Hicks's lawyer, Robert Trout, told the Times last month.

Hicks also made headlines this month when it was revealed she was in a relationship with Rob Porter, the now-ousted White House staff secretary accused by his two ex-wives of domestic abuse.