Five takeaways from Trump’s meeting on guns

President TrumpDonald TrumpTrump hails Arizona Senate for audit at Phoenix rally, slams governor Arkansas governor says it's 'disappointing' vaccinations have become 'political' Watch live: Trump attends rally in Phoenix MORE shook up the gun control debate — and many members of his own party — with a televised White House meeting with lawmakers that lasted more than an hour on Wednesday afternoon.

Trump expressed support for a number of gun control measures, including strengthened background checks and stricter age limits, even as he held fast to his insistence that schools should be made “harder” targets by permitting teachers and other personnel to be armed.

The reverberations from the meeting will continue for days, but what were the main takeaways?

Trump really does want action

There had been considerable skepticism over whether Trump was really intent upon taking action on gun violence, long a vexing issue in American politics, in the days immediately after the Feb. 14 Parkland, Fla., shooting.

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But his demand to get something done appeared both genuine and urgent during Wednesday’s meeting. He repeatedly made the point that other presidents had failed to make progress on the issue but that he intended to do so.

Trump’s desire for action included some moves that will cause serious unease to the National Rifle Association (NRA) and other gun rights groups.

Trump was dismissive of the idea of including so-called concealed carry reciprocity measures alongside broader legislation, arguing it would delay the effort to get something done. “You’ll never get it passed,” he told House Majority Whip Steve ScaliseStephen (Steve) Joseph ScaliseDemocrats question GOP shift on vaccines The Hill's Morning Report - Pelosi considers adding GOP voices to Jan. 6 panel McConnell pushes vaccines, but GOP muddles his message MORE (R-La.).

Trump at times suggested that his predecessor, President Obama, had not asserted himself strongly enough in the push for gun control — a claim that overlooks the efforts Obama made, in vain, to pass stricter gun laws after the mass shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn., in 2012.

But the Obama comparison also shows the extent to which Trump is making it a matter of personal pride to notch up some kind of achievement on gun laws.

That, in itself, seems to increase the chances of success.

Heartburn for the NRA

Trump took aim at the NRA during the hourlong meeting, positioning himself as unafraid of the powerful gun lobby that has dominated politics for decades.

When GOP Sen. Pat ToomeyPatrick (Pat) Joseph ToomeyBlack women look to build upon gains in coming elections Watch live: GOP senators present new infrastructure proposal Sasse rebuked by Nebraska Republican Party over impeachment vote MORE (Pa.) told Trump that his 2013 background check bill didn’t raise the minimum age for buying a rifle, Trump fired back: “You know why? Because you're afraid of the NRA, right?”

The NRA has come out strongly against increasing the minimum age from 18 to 21. But Trump, describing himself as a “fan” of the organization, urged lawmakers to consider including such a provision in their bill.

Trump also told them he wanted to be “very powerful” on background checks and warned that including concealed carry reciprocity would sink the overall legislation.

The NRA released a statement late Wednesday afternoon, which did not mention Trump. The group called the White House event “great TV” and warned that legislation should not “punish law-abiding Americans.”

Sen. John CornynJohn CornynSchumer feels pressure from all sides on spending strategy Data reveal big opportunity to finish the vaccine job GOP senators invite Yellen to brief them on debt ceiling expiration, inflation MORE (R-Texas) downplayed the idea that Trump’s comments would result in a shift on Capitol Hill on guns.

“I wouldn’t confuse what he said with what can actually pass. So I think I don’t expect to see any great divergence in terms of people’s views on the Second Amendment, for example,” Cornyn said.

Trump believes these meetings work for him

This is the second lengthy meeting where Trump has allowed lawmakers to put forth divergent ideas on a contentious issue. The first came on immigration last month

Additionally, Trump’s White House meeting with Parkland survivors last week also struck an unusual tone. Instead of the tightly scripted, buttoned-down events of the past, Trump spent most of his time listening, while people affected by gun violence delivered raw, emotional speeches.

The degree to which the White House is willing to jettison the script in favor of looser, more improvisational gatherings is fascinating — not least because of what it says politically.

Trump aides clearly feel the approach helps him, and it’s not hard to see why. Trump in listening mode seems a less combative and polarizing figure than at his campaign rallies.

Meetings with lawmakers also allow Trump to cast himself in his favorite role of dealmaker, willing to go against his own party's orthodoxy.

That happened at the immigration meeting, where he seemed to signal agreement with Sen. Dianne FeinsteinDianne Emiel FeinsteinBiden signs bill to bolster crime victims fund Stripping opportunity from DC's children Progressive groups ask for town hall with Feinstein to talk filibuster MORE (D-Calif.) on the need for a clean bill to replace the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, to the evident unease of House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthyKevin McCarthySunday shows preview: Bipartisan infrastructure talks drag on; Democrats plow ahead with Jan. 6 probe Democrats question GOP shift on vaccines Has Trump beaten the system? MORE (R-Calif.).

On Wednesday, Trump expressed support for bipartisan legislation and requested that such legislation incorporate ideas from two Democratic senators, Feinstein and Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy KlobucharBiden signals tough stance on tech with antitrust picks Hillicon Valley: Democrats introduce bill to hold platforms accountable for misinformation during health crises | Website outages hit Olympics, Amazon and major banks Competition laws could be a death knell for startup mergers and acquisitions MORE (D-Minn.).

One caveat, however: The expansive tone of these meetings does not necessarily last for long.

Just two days after the immigration encounter, Trump caused an uproar by reportedly referring to “shithole countries” at a subsequent, closed White House meeting.

His spontaneous style complicates legislation

Trump’s freewheeling style sparked immediate confusion on Capitol Hill about the path forward.

Cornyn and Sen. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioBipartisan congressional commission urges IOC to postpone, relocate Beijing Games Hillicon Valley: Democrats introduce bill to hold platforms accountable for misinformation during health crises | Website outages hit Olympics, Amazon and major banks Senators introduce bipartisan bill to secure critical groups against hackers MORE (R-Fla.) pointed to the Fix NICS (National Instant Background Check System) Act as the bill the Senate should take up, while Democrats and Toomey thought Trump added new life to the 2013 Manchin-Toomey background check bill.

“He knows something has to be done. It’s the most reasonable approach. It was good in 2013. It’s good now. So we’ll use it as our base and work off of it,” Sen. Joe ManchinJoe ManchinWhy Biden's Interior Department isn't shutting down oil and gas Overnight Energy: Senate panel advances controversial public lands nominee | Nevada Democrat introduces bill requiring feds to develop fire management plan | NJ requiring public water systems to replace lead pipes in 10 years Transit funding, broadband holding up infrastructure deal MORE (D-W.Va.) said.

The Manchin-Toomey proposal failed to get 60 votes in 2013, with five red state Democrats siding with Republicans to help sink the bill.

Cornyn, however, argued that “for me the most obvious place to start is the Fix NICS bill that has 46 co-sponsors.”

Trump repeatedly urged Cornyn to expand his legislation to include expanded background checks and even suggested renaming it as the “U.S. background check bill or whatever.”

If Trump sticks by his comments, GOP lawmakers and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellHouse Democrats grow frustrated as they feel ignored by Senate Democrats question GOP shift on vaccines Has Trump beaten the system? MORE (R-Ky.) could be forced to pick between bucking Trump and sticking with the narrower Fix NICS bill or crossing gun groups influential among the party’s base.

The meeting was reminiscent of the January talks on immigration. Trump said at the time that he would sign whatever bill Congress sent him only to shoot down a bipartisan proposal two days later.

“Today he said he supported everything … we’ll see where he comes down next week,” said Sen. Dick DurbinDick DurbinNew York gun rights case before Supreme Court with massive consequences  Schumer leaves door open for second vote on bipartisan infrastructure deal Bipartisan group says it's still on track after setback on Senate floor MORE (D-Ill.).

Sen. John KennedyJohn Neely KennedyMORE (R-La.) acknowledged he didn’t know if the president would stick with his positions but “presidents are people, too. They can change their minds.”

Lawmakers believe they can flatter Trump

Lawmakers appeared to be appealing to Trump’s ego as they tried to win over his support for their gun control ideas.

Members stressed that Trump, who has touted his ability to make deals, could help get a gun control bill across the finish line after past presidents had tried and failed.

“Well, and in all fairness, this is a bill that basically, with your support, it would pass,” Manchin told Trump as he described the 2013 background checks bill. Meanwhile, Feinstein, when Trump asked if she could add in some of her proposals, responded: “If you help.”

Trump appeared to lap up the attention. He repeatedly pushed lawmakers to say what had foiled previous gun bills was a lack of support from the White House — namely the Obama administration.

“I like that responsibility, Chris, I really do,” he said to Democratic Sen. Chris MurphyChristopher (Chris) Scott MurphyOvernight Defense: US launches another airstrike in Somalia | Amendment to expand Pentagon recusal period added to NDAA | No. 2 State Dept. official to lead nuclear talks with Russia US launches second Somalia strike in week On The Money: Senate braces for nasty debt ceiling fight | Democrats pushing for changes to bipartisan deal | Housing prices hit new high in June MORE (Conn.). “It's time that a president stepped up.”

It’s hardly the first time officials have resorted to flattery. During a televised June meeting, cabinet officials went one-by-one around the table praising Trump.

Lawmakers have previously mocked Trump over his ego. Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerChuck SchumerMcConnell pushes vaccines, but GOP muddles his message Biden administration stokes frustration over Canada Schumer blasts McCarthy for picking people who 'supported the big lie' for Jan. 6 panel MORE (D-N.Y.) parodied the Cabinet meeting by releasing a video of three staffers sitting around a table praising him.

“GREAT meeting today with the best staff in the history of the world!!!” Schumer said in a tweet accompanying the video.