US diplomats told not to retweet, post statement on Tillerson ouster: report

US diplomats told not to retweet, post statement on Tillerson ouster: report
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U.S. diplomats around the world on Tuesday were told by Washington not to post or retweet a statement by now-former Undersecretary of State Steven Goldstein that apparently contradicted the White House's account of Secretary of State Rex TillersonRex Wayne TillersonTillerson: Netanyahu 'played' Trump with misinformation Pompeo sees status grow with Bolton exit Trump blasts 'Mr. Tough Guy' Bolton: 'He made some very big mistakes' MORE's firing.

Guidance sent to American diplomatic outposts also instructed officials to "freeze further amplification of content that features" Tillerson until he spoke publicly later that day, CNN reported.

The guidance came shortly after President TrumpDonald John TrumpAlaska Republican Party cancels 2020 primary Ukrainian official denies Trump pressured president Trump goes after New York Times, Washington Post: 'They have gone totally CRAZY!!!!' MORE abruptly announced in a tweet that he had fired Tillerson and tapped CIA Director Mike PompeoMichael (Mike) Richard PompeoBolton replacement inherits tough challenges — including Trump Saudi Arabia says it will take 'appropriate' action if Iran's role in attacks confirmed Clarence Thomas, Joe Manchin, Rudy Giuliani among guests at second state visit under Trump MORE to replace him at the State Department.

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Goldstein was also fired Tuesday after he issued a statement saying that Tillerson was unaware of the reason for his firing and had not spoken to the president about the matter.

That statement apparently contradicted the official account of the White House, which had claimed that Tillerson had been aware that the announcement was coming.

The guidance instructing U.S. diplomats to avoid quoting a statement from an undersecretary was highly unusual, multiple diplomats told CNN.

An official had already begun translating Goldstein's statement into different languages for U.S. Embassies, but ultimately stopped amid the confusion, the network reported.