Trump informally offered Cohn CIA job before changing his mind: report

Trump informally offered Cohn CIA job before changing his mind: report
© Greg Nash

President TrumpDonald John TrumpOver 100 lawmakers consistently voted against chemical safeguards: study CNN's Anderson Cooper unloads on Trump Jr. for spreading 'idiotic' conspiracy theories about him Cohn: Jamie Dimon would be 'phenomenal' president MORE informally offered former White House economic adviser Gary Cohn the job as head of the CIA, but ultimately changed his mind, Politico reported Monday.

Cohn, who resigned earlier this month, had reportedly expressed interested in returning to the administration for the CIA job. The position became available last week when Trump fired Secretary of State Rex TillersonRex Wayne TillersonPompeo working to rebuild ties with US diplomats: report NYT says it was unfair on Haley curtain story Rubio defends Haley over curtains story: Example of media pushing bias MORE and said he intended to replace him with CIA Director Mike PompeoMichael (Mike) Richard PompeoOvernight Defense: Air Force outlines plan for biggest force since end of Cold War | Trump admin slashes refugee cap | Mattis accuses Russia of meddling in Macedonia's NATO bid Hillicon Valley: Elon Musk sued by diver from Thai cave rescue | Researchers find new malware family | FEMA delays new presidential alert test Trump administration to cut refugee admissions to 30K for 2019 MORE.

Trump informally offered Cohn the position, and Cohn agreed to take it, Politico reported, citing three people close to the president.

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It’s unclear why Trump changed his mind and ultimately named Gina Haspel as his choice for CIA director.

Cohn does not have a background in the intelligence community, having come from Goldman Sachs before serving in the White House. He resigned earlier this month amid a disagreement with Trump over the president's steel and aluminum tariffs.

The president has tapped CNBC contributor Larry Kudlow to replace Cohn.

Haspel, meanwhile, has drawn criticism from some lawmakers ahead of her confirmation hearing. Sens. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainAnother recession could hit US in 2019, says credit union association chief R-E-S-P-E-C-T: One legacy of Franklin and McCain is up to us To cure Congress, elect more former military members MORE (R-Ariz.) and Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulSome employees' personal data revealed in State Department email breach: report The Hill's 12:30 Report — Trump says Dems inflated Puerto Rico death toll | House cancels Friday votes | Florence starts to hit coast The Hill's Morning Report — Sponsored by Better Medicare Alliance — Facing major hurricane, Trump is tested MORE (R-Ky.) have expressed concerns about her ties to the "enhanced interrogation" program carried out under the George W. Bush administration.

Paul on Sunday vowed to do "whatever it takes" to block Haspel's nomination, including a filibuster. He said he'd do the same to stop Pompeo's nomination as secretary of State.