Trump informally offered Cohn CIA job before changing his mind: report

Trump informally offered Cohn CIA job before changing his mind: report
© Greg Nash

President TrumpDonald John TrumpGillibrand backs federal classification of third gender: report Former Carter pollster, Bannon ally Patrick Caddell dies at 68 Heather Nauert withdraws her name from consideration for UN Ambassador job MORE informally offered former White House economic adviser Gary Cohn the job as head of the CIA, but ultimately changed his mind, Politico reported Monday.

Cohn, who resigned earlier this month, had reportedly expressed interested in returning to the administration for the CIA job. The position became available last week when Trump fired Secretary of State Rex TillersonRex Wayne TillersonHeather Nauert withdraws her name from consideration for UN Ambassador job Trump administration’s top European diplomat to resign in February Pompeo planning to meet with Pat Roberts amid 2020 Senate speculation MORE and said he intended to replace him with CIA Director Mike PompeoMichael (Mike) Richard PompeoHeather Nauert withdraws her name from consideration for UN Ambassador job The Hill's Morning Report — Presented by the American Academy of HIV Medicine — Trump, Congress prepare for new border wall fight Overnight Defense: Trump to sign funding deal, declare national emergency | Shanahan says allies will be consulted on Afghanistan | Dem demands Khashoggi documents MORE.

Trump informally offered Cohn the position, and Cohn agreed to take it, Politico reported, citing three people close to the president.

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It’s unclear why Trump changed his mind and ultimately named Gina Haspel as his choice for CIA director.

Cohn does not have a background in the intelligence community, having come from Goldman Sachs before serving in the White House. He resigned earlier this month amid a disagreement with Trump over the president's steel and aluminum tariffs.

The president has tapped CNBC contributor Larry Kudlow to replace Cohn.

Haspel, meanwhile, has drawn criticism from some lawmakers ahead of her confirmation hearing. Sens. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainPence met with silence after mentioning Trump in Munich speech Mark Kelly's campaign raises over M in days after launching Senate bid The Hill's 12:30 Report — Presented by Kidney Care Partners — Lawmakers wait for Trump's next move on border deal MORE (R-Ariz.) and Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulCongress must step up to protect Medicare home health care Business, conservative groups slam Trump’s national emergency declaration The Hill's 12:30 Report — Presented by Kidney Care Partners — Trump escalates border fight with emergency declaration MORE (R-Ky.) have expressed concerns about her ties to the "enhanced interrogation" program carried out under the George W. Bush administration.

Paul on Sunday vowed to do "whatever it takes" to block Haspel's nomination, including a filibuster. He said he'd do the same to stop Pompeo's nomination as secretary of State.