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Trump considered ousting Kelly and serving as his own chief of staff: report

President TrumpDonald TrumpGraham: 'I could not disagree more' with Trump support of Afghanistan troop withdrawal GOP believes Democrats handing them winning 2022 campaign Former GOP operative installed as NSA top lawyer resigns MORE reportedly considered firing chief of staff John KellyJohn Francis KellyMORE earlier this month and fulfilling the duties himself rather than naming a replacement.

NBC News reported Thursday that Trump suggested to others outside the White House that he would leave the chief of staff position open. He would then receive direct reports from a handful of top aides, in a set-up that would resemble how he operated the Trump Organization. 

Trump has reportedly tabled the concept for the time being. 

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The report was published hours after former White House chief strategist Stephen Bannon suggested at a Financial Times event that if Kelly were to depart the administration, Trump would not replace him.

Trump and Kelly have reportedly clashed at various times since Kelly took over for Reince PriebusReinhold (Reince) Richard PriebusBiden's is not a leaky ship of state — not yet Governor races to test COVID-19 response, Trump influence Ex-Trump chief of staff Priebus mulling Wisconsin governor bid MORE last summer. However, the president is said to have recently told advisers that Kelly's job is "100 percent safe." 

Reported discussions about the future of Kelly's role come amid a major shake-up in the Trump administration.

Trump announced Thursday that national security adviser H.R. McMaster will leave his post on April 9 and will be replaced by former U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations John Bolton.

Secretary of State Rex TillersonRex Wayne TillersonBiden's is not a leaky ship of state — not yet With salami-slicing and swarming tactics, China's aggression continues Lawmakers to roll out legislation reorganizing State cyber office MORE was fired last week, and top economic adviser Gary CohnGary David CohnOn The Money: Wall Street zeros in on Georgia runoffs | Seven states sue regulator over 'true lender' rule on interest rates | 2021 deficit on track to reach .3 trillion Former Trump economic aide Gary Cohn joins IBM The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by the UAE Embassy in Washington, DC - Trump OKs transition; Biden taps Treasury, State experience MORE resigned earlier this month.