Trump asked aides about making Labor secretary his new attorney general: report

Trump asked aides about making Labor secretary his new attorney general: report
© Greg Nash

President TrumpDonald John TrumpOver 100 lawmakers consistently voted against chemical safeguards: study CNN's Anderson Cooper unloads on Trump Jr. for spreading 'idiotic' conspiracy theories about him Cohn: Jamie Dimon would be 'phenomenal' president MORE reportedly asked an aide if Labor Secretary Alexander AcostaRene (Alex) Alexander AcostaHere are the administration officials who have denied they wrote the anonymous NYT op-ed Trump Cabinet officials rush to distance themselves from anonymous op-ed Trump Jr. falsely claims that GDP growth never passed 2 percent under Obama MORE would make a good replacement for Attorney General Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsThe Hill’s 12:30 Report — Kavanaugh accuser willing to testify | Kavanaugh denies allegations, says he’s willing to testify | 50 days from the midterms Ken Starr backs Mueller, says president 'must be held accountable' The Hill's Morning Report — Sponsored by United Against Nuclear Iran — Kavanaugh confirmation in sudden turmoil MORE.

The inquiry came after the president saw Acosta on “Fox & Friends” one morning, The Washington Post reported.

However, it is unclear if Trump is truly considering Acosta for the job, given that the president has been prone to speculating about replacements for different officials, the newspaper noted.

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The president repeatedly criticized Sessions after the attorney general recused himself from the special counsel's investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 election.

Trump reportedly wants to fire Sessions, but has been pressured to hold off as it might be damaging as the Russia investigation unfolds.

Several members of Trump’s team have left the White House in recent days.

Secretary of State Rex TillersonRex Wayne TillersonPompeo working to rebuild ties with US diplomats: report NYT says it was unfair on Haley curtain story Rubio defends Haley over curtains story: Example of media pushing bias MORE was pushed out earlier this month, and CIA Director Mike PompeoMichael (Mike) Richard PompeoOvernight Defense: Air Force outlines plan for biggest force since end of Cold War | Trump admin slashes refugee cap | Mattis accuses Russia of meddling in Macedonia's NATO bid Hillicon Valley: Elon Musk sued by diver from Thai cave rescue | Researchers find new malware family | FEMA delays new presidential alert test Trump administration to cut refugee admissions to 30K for 2019 MORE was nominated to take his place.

Trump’s top economic adviser, Gary CohnGary David CohnCohn: Jamie Dimon would be 'phenomenal' president On The Money: Trump announces new China tariffs | Wall Street salaries hit highest level since 2008 | GOP bets the House on the economy Financial policymakers must be suffering from amnesia MORE, also resigned after Trump announced tariffs on imported steel and aluminum that he opposed. He will be replaced by the CNBC commentator Larry Kudlow, who is also an opinions contributor for The Hill.

Veterans Affairs Secretary David ShulkinDavid Jonathon ShulkinVeterans group sues to block advisers known as ‘Mar-a-Lago Crowd’ from influencing VA Mar-a-Lago insiders provided input on VA policy, personnel decisions: report Ahead of speech, Kansas City newspaper urges Trump to listen to veterans MORE is rumored to be the next Cabinet member out the door, although the White House has sent mixed messages on his status.

Trump has also gone after special counsel Robert MuellerRobert Swan MuellerSasse: US should applaud choice of Mueller to lead Russia probe MORE on Twitter, calling his investigation a witch hunt and arguing that it should have never begun because there was no collusion between his campaign and Russia.

The White House, however, says Trump is not considering firing Mueller and will cooperate with his investigation.