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Trump tried to fire Mueller in December: report

President TrumpDonald Trump Pence said he's 'proud' Congress certified Biden's win on Jan. 6 Americans put the most trust in their doctor for COVID-19 information: poll OVERNIGHT DEFENSE: Biden administration to evacuate Afghans who helped US l Serious differences remain between US and Iran on nuclear talks l US, Turkish officials meet to discuss security plans for Afghan airport MORE attempted to fire special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) MuellerSenate Democrats urge Garland not to fight court order to release Trump obstruction memo Why a special counsel is guaranteed if Biden chooses Yates, Cuomo or Jones as AG Barr taps attorney investigating Russia probe origins as special counsel MORE in December, The New York Times reported Tuesday.

Trump reportedly tried to fire Mueller after he became enraged over reports that the special counsel had subpoenaed Deutsche Bank for records on Trump’s finances.

However, Mueller’s team told the White House that the reports were inaccurate and the president backed off from the move, the Times reported. Trump’s lawyers also did not believe the reports to be accurate, because Trump did not keep his money in the bank.

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The report comes the same day that the White House said Trump believes he has the power to fire Mueller.

The White House's remarks came a day after a raid by FBI agents on the office and hotel room of Michael Cohen, Trump's personal attorney. The Washington Post reported Monday that Cohen is under investigation for possible bank fraud, wire fraud and campaign finance violations. 

The Times reported Tuesday that the agents that carried out the raid were seeking documents pertaining to payments made to two women — adult-film actress Stormy Daniels and former Playboy model Karen McDougal — who have alleged having affairs with Trump years ago.

The episode involving Cohen infuriated Trump, who called the raid a "disgrace" and "an attack on our country in a true sense." He also reportedly seethed over the fact that Deputy Attorney General Rod RosensteinRod RosensteinHouse Judiciary to probe DOJ's seizure of data from lawmakers, journalists The Hill's Morning Report - Biden-Putin meeting to dominate the week Media leaders to meet with Garland to discuss leak investigations MORE signed off on the decision to conduct the raid.

The FBI raid on Cohen's hotel room and office came after federal prosecutors in Manhattan obtained a search warrant based, in part, on a referral by Mueller. 

The threat to fire Mueller in December was not Trump's first. The Times previously reported that the president sought to have Mueller dismissed last June, but ultimately backed down after White House counsel Don McGahn threatened to resign.

Legal experts say Trump does not have the power to fire the special counsel directly. Under Department of Justice (DOJ) regulations, that authority falls to the department official in charge of the investigation — in this case, Rosenstein.

--Updated at 7:31 p.m.