Hatch: Those advising Trump to fire Mueller going against 'nation's best interest'

Hatch: Those advising Trump to fire Mueller going against 'nation's best interest'
© Greg Nash

Sen. Orrin HatchOrrin Grant HatchTrump awards Medal of Freedom to racing industry icon Roger Penske Trump holds more Medal of Freedom ceremonies than predecessors but awards fewer medals Trump to award Medal of Freedom to former Attorney General Edwin Meese MORE (R-Utah) on Thursday warned that anyone advising President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump faces high stakes in meeting with Erdoğan amid impeachment drama Democrats worry they don't have right candidate to beat Trump Trump threatening to fire Mulvaney: report MORE to fire special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerSpeier says impeachment inquiry shows 'very strong case of bribery' by Trump Gowdy: I '100 percent' still believe public congressional hearings are 'a circus' Comey: Mueller 'didn't succeed in his mission because there was inadequate transparency' MORE doesn't have “the nation’s best interest at heart."

“Anyone advising the President — in public or over the airwaves — to fire Bob Mueller does not have the President or the nation’s best interest at heart,” Hatch tweeted. “Full stop.”

Hatch released a statement last month urging Trump to allow the investigation to continue "uninterrupted." 

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"I know Bob Mueller well and believe him to be a straight shooter, and I continue to believe that giving him the time and support necessary to get to the bottom of things is the best interest of all parties involved," Hatch said. 

Hatch said then that his conversations with the Trump White House convinced him that Trump "would not take such a foolish action." 

The Thursday criticism from the longest serving Republican senator came shortly after Trump denounced a New York Times report that he tried to fire Mueller in December.

“If I wanted to fire Robert Mueller in December, as reported by the Failing New York Times, I would have fired him,” Trump tweeted early Thursday. “Just more Fake News from a biased newspaper!”

On Monday, Trump said “many people” have suggested that he fire Mueller, who has been leading the investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 presidential election.

White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said the following day that Trump “certainly believes” he has the power to oust the special counsel, despite many legal experts saying that it would be Deputy Attorney General Rod RosensteinRod RosensteinDemocrats ask judge to force McGahn to comply with subpoena Democrats ask court to force DOJ's hand on Mueller grand jury materials Washington celebrates diplomacy — and baseball — at Meridian Ball MORE who would have to make the decision, since Attorney General Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsMedill dean 'deeply troubled by the vicious bullying and badgering' of student journalists Trump has considered firing official who reported whistleblower complaint to Congress: report Northwestern student paper apologizes for coverage of 'traumatic' Jeff Sessions event MORE has recused himself from Russia-related investigations.

Some Trump allies have been calling on the president to fire Mueller in the days following the FBI raid on Trump’s personal lawyer, Michael Cohen.

Former Speaker Newt Gingrich (R-Ga.) compared the raid to Stalin and the Gestapo, Nazi Germany's secret police. 

However, several prominent party members have urged Trump not to fire Mueller.

Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Chuck GrassleyCharles (Chuck) Ernest GrassleyOvernight Health Care: Top health official defends contract payments to Trump allies | Vaping advocates confident Trump will turn from flavor ban | Sanders gets endorsement from nurses union McConnell, GOP leaders say they won't be watching House impeachment hearing Poll: 1 in 5 US adults report trouble affording prescription drugs MORE (R-Iowa) declared Tuesday that “it would be suicide for the president to fire him.”

Sens. Thom TillisThomas (Thom) Roland TillisThis week: House kicks off public phase of impeachment inquiry Progressive veterans group launches campaign labeling Trump as a 'national security threat' Trump rules out total rollback of Chinese tariffs MORE (R-N.C.) and Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamGraham says Trump should be allowed to undo DACA order The Hill's 12:30 Report: Dems, GOP dig in for public impeachment hearings The Hill's Morning Report - Witness transcripts plow ground for public impeachment testimony MORE (R-S.C.) have both sponsored bipartisan bills to protect the special counsel from being fired by the president.