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Trump to pardon ex-Cheney aide Scooter Libby: report

Trump to pardon ex-Cheney aide Scooter Libby: report
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President TrumpDonald TrumpBiden administration still seizing land near border despite plans to stop building wall: report Illinois House passes bill that would mandate Asian-American history lessons in schools Overnight Defense: Administration says 'low to moderate confidence' Russia behind Afghanistan troop bounties | 'Low to medium risk' of Russia invading Ukraine in next few weeks | Intelligence leaders face sharp questions during House worldwide threats he MORE is expected to pardon I. Lewis "Scooter" Libby, the former chief of staff to then-Vice President Dick Cheney, ABC News reported Thursday.

The president has reportedly already signed off on the pardon for Libby, who was convicted in 2007 for lying to the FBI and obstructing justice in the investigation into who leaked the identity of ex-CIA agent Valerie Plame.

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Multiple people claimed that Libby leaked Plame's identity to them after he had publicly stated he was not the source of the information.

Former President George W. Bush commuted Libby’s subsequent 30-month prison sentence, but did not pardon him. 

Libby would mark Trump’s second pardon of a controversial figure since he took office.

He pardoned Joe Arpaio last August after the former Maricopa County, Ariz., sheriff had been found guilty of contempt of court when a Justice Department investigation found he racially profiled Latinos.

The New York Times also reported late last month that John Dowd, Trump's former lawyer, discussed with the president last year the possibility of pardoning two former associates who have been caught up in special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) MuellerWhy a special counsel is guaranteed if Biden chooses Yates, Cuomo or Jones as AG Barr taps attorney investigating Russia probe origins as special counsel CNN's Toobin warns McCabe is in 'perilous condition' with emboldened Trump MORE's probe into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election.

The White House said in response that there has been no consideration or discussion of pardons "at this time."