Comey: There's 'some evidence' Trump obstructed justice

Comey: There's 'some evidence' Trump obstructed justice
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Former FBI Director James ComeyJames Brien ComeyTrump commutes sentence of ex-Illinois Gov. Blagojevich A tale of two lies: Stone, McCabe and the danger of a double standard for justice DOJ attorney looking into whether CIA withheld info during start of Russia probe: NYT MORE said there’s evidence that President TrumpDonald John TrumpCensus Bureau spends millions on ad campaign to mitigate fears on excluded citizenship question Bloomberg campaign: Primary is two-way race with Sanders Democratic senator meets with Iranian foreign minister MORE obstructed justice.

In a new interview with ABC’s George Stephanopoulos that aired Sunday, Comey said there’s “certainly some evidence” that Trump obstructed justice when he was asked about the investigation into his former national security adviser Michael Flynn.

“It would depend, and — and I'm just a witness in this case, not the investigator or prosecutor — it would depend upon other things that reflected on his intent,” Comey said.

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The remarks came in response to a question about the conversation regarding the probe into Flynn where Trump allegedly told Comey, “I hope you can let it go.”

The meeting reportedly took place on Feb. 14, one day after Flynn resigned.

Trump said Flynn was a “good guy,” Comey said.

“I just said, ‘I agree he's a good guy,’ … And so — then full-stop. And there was a brief pause. And then the meeting was over,” Comey said in the interview.

Stephanopoulos pressed Comey on if he should have interjected and told Trump that was inappropriate, which Comey said was a fair criticism.

“Although, as I've thought about it since, if he didn't know he was doing something improper, why did he kick out the attorney general and the vice president of the United States and the leaders of the intelligence community?” Comey said. “I mean, why am I alone if he's — doesn't know the nature of the request?”

Obstruction of justice is the federal crime of “corruptly or by threat, or force” trying to influence, obstruct, influence or impede the due process of justice.

Legal experts say there is a multitude of ways that obstruction can be committed, including destroying or tampering with evidence, intimidating witnesses or trying to cover up a crime.