Trump admits mistakes with Cabinet picks

President TrumpDonald John TrumpHannity urges Trump not to fire 'anybody' after Rosenstein report Ben Carson appears to tie allegation against Kavanaugh to socialist plot Five takeaways from Cruz, O'Rourke's fiery first debate MORE on Monday conceded he made mistakes in assembling his Cabinet, which has already seen three departures.

Trump made the rare admission while praising Labor Secretary Alex AcostaRene (Alex) Alexander AcostaHow private sector can fight opioid epidemic Federal mine safety official accused Trump of illegally putting miners in danger Here are the administration officials who have denied they wrote the anonymous NYT op-ed MORE and Treasury Secretary Steven MnuchinSteven Terner MnuchinOn The Money: Trump signs first 2019 'minibus' spending package | Mueller probing transactions by Russian organizers of Trump Tower meeting | Stocks brush off trade fears On The Money: Cohen reportedly questioned over Trump dealings with Russia | Trump hails economy | Tells workers to 'start looking' if they want a better job | Internal poll shows tax law backfiring on GOP Trump announces tariffs on 0B in Chinese goods MORE during a tax event in Miami.

"Not all of my choices were good, but they were great ones,” the president said.

The president did not single out any Cabinet officials for criticism.

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Many of Trump’s Cabinet picks have faced accusations of ethical misconduct or clashed with the president for personal and political reasons.

The president this year fired Secretary of State Rex TillersonRex Wayne TillersonPompeo working to rebuild ties with US diplomats: report NYT says it was unfair on Haley curtain story Rubio defends Haley over curtains story: Example of media pushing bias MORE after months of disagreements and also gave the axe to Veterans Affairs Secretary David ShulkinDavid Jonathon ShulkinVeterans group sues to block advisers known as ‘Mar-a-Lago Crowd’ from influencing VA Mar-a-Lago insiders provided input on VA policy, personnel decisions: report Ahead of speech, Kansas City newspaper urges Trump to listen to veterans MORE, who faced criticism over taxpayer-funded travel and fought with other officials over health-care issues.

Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott PruittEdward (Scott) Scott PruittGovernment watchdog probing EPA’s handling of Hurricane Harvey response Wheeler won’t stop America’s addiction to fossil fuels Overnight Energy: Trump rolls back methane pollution rule | EPA watchdog to step down | China puts tariffs on US gas MORE and Housing and Urban Development Secretary Ben CarsonBenjamin (Ben) Solomon CarsonBen Carson appears to tie allegation against Kavanaugh to socialist plot The Hill's Morning Report — Sponsored by United Against Nuclear Iran — Kavanaugh, accuser say they’re prepared to testify Report: A third of Ben Carson’s appointees have no housing experience MORE are also facing scrutiny for spending taxpayer dollars on office improvements, amid other actions.

Last year, Health and Human Services Secretary Tom PriceThomas (Tom) Edmunds PriceWhite House officials discussing potential replacements for FEMA chief: report Overnight Health Care: CBO finds bill delaying parts of ObamaCare costs B | Drug CEO defends 400 percent price hike | HHS declares health emergency ahead of hurricane HHS should look into Azar's close ties to the drug industry MORE was forced to resign after it was revealed he frequently used a private jet to travel on government business.

Trump’s first pick to lead the Department of Labor, Andrew Puzder, withdrew his nomination after it was revealed he employed a housekeeper who was living illegally in the U.S.

The president has faced persistent criticism from people who say he failed to properly vet his choices to fill key administration posts.