Trump admits mistakes with Cabinet picks

President TrumpDonald John TrumpBooker hits Biden's defense of remarks about segregationist senators: 'He's better than this' Booker hits Biden's defense of remarks about segregationist senators: 'He's better than this' Trump says Democrats are handing out subpoenas 'like they're cookies' MORE on Monday conceded he made mistakes in assembling his Cabinet, which has already seen three departures.

Trump made the rare admission while praising Labor Secretary Alex AcostaRene (Alex) Alexander AcostaTop aide to Labor secretary to leave amid friction with White House George Conway slams Trump for calling Biden 'creepy': You 'palled around with Jeffrey Epstein' Melania Trump expands mission of 'Be Best' on its one-year anniversary MORE and Treasury Secretary Steven MnuchinSteven Terner MnuchinSchumer requests investigation into Trump admin decision to delay bill featuring Harriet Tubman Schumer requests investigation into Trump admin decision to delay bill featuring Harriet Tubman Overnight Defense: House passes T spending package with defense funds | Senate set to vote on blocking Saudi arms sales | UN nominee defends climate change record MORE during a tax event in Miami.

"Not all of my choices were good, but they were great ones,” the president said.

The president did not single out any Cabinet officials for criticism.

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Many of Trump’s Cabinet picks have faced accusations of ethical misconduct or clashed with the president for personal and political reasons.

The president this year fired Secretary of State Rex TillersonRex Wayne TillersonBolton says Russia, China seeking to promote discord in Trump administration Bolton says Russia, China seeking to promote discord in Trump administration Trump's nastiest break-ups: A look at the president's most fiery feuds MORE after months of disagreements and also gave the axe to Veterans Affairs Secretary David ShulkinDavid Jonathon ShulkinTrump sent policy pitch from Mar-a-Lago member to VA secretary: report Is a presidential appointment worth the risk? It’s time to end the scare tactics and get to work for our veterans MORE, who faced criticism over taxpayer-funded travel and fought with other officials over health-care issues.

Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott PruittEdward (Scott) Scott PruittTrump directs agencies to cut advisory boards by 'at least' one-third Trump directs agencies to cut advisory boards by 'at least' one-third Overnight Energy: Former EPA chiefs say Trump has abandoned agency's mission | Trump in Iowa touts ethanol and knocks Biden | Greens sue Trump over drilling safety rollbacks | FDA downplays worries over 'forever chemicals' MORE and Housing and Urban Development Secretary Ben CarsonBenjamin (Ben) Solomon CarsonHousing authorities raise concerns about Trump plan to evict undocumented immigrants Housing authorities raise concerns about Trump plan to evict undocumented immigrants Moulton confirms he'll miss first Democratic debate MORE are also facing scrutiny for spending taxpayer dollars on office improvements, amid other actions.

Last year, Health and Human Services Secretary Tom PriceThomas (Tom) Edmunds PriceDemocrats constantly overlook conservative solutions to fix our broken health care Democrats constantly overlook conservative solutions to fix our broken health care Overnight Health Care: CEO of largest private health insurer slams 'Medicare for All' plans | Dem bill targets youth tobacco use | CVS fined over fake painkiller prescriptions | Trump, first lady to discuss opioid crisis at summit MORE was forced to resign after it was revealed he frequently used a private jet to travel on government business.

Trump’s first pick to lead the Department of Labor, Andrew Puzder, withdrew his nomination after it was revealed he employed a housekeeper who was living illegally in the U.S.

The president has faced persistent criticism from people who say he failed to properly vet his choices to fill key administration posts.