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Dem senators demand Trump explain ties to Koch brothers

Dem senators demand Trump explain ties to Koch brothers
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Senate Democrats are demanding that the Trump administration explain its ties to GOP mega-donor brothers Charles and David Koch after the brothers' network took credit for some policies passed during President TrumpDonald TrumpVirginia GOP gubernatorial nominee acknowledges Biden was 'legitimately' elected Biden meets with DACA recipients on immigration reform Overnight Health Care: States begin lifting mask mandates after new CDC guidance | Walmart, Trader Joe's will no longer require customers to wear masks | CDC finds Pfizer, Moderna vaccines 94 percent effective in health workers MORE’s first year in office, McClatchy reported.

The letters come after a report was sent to a group of Koch donors called the Seminar Network that took responsibility for roughly a dozen new policies passed by the Trump administration, including the new GOP tax law and the repeal of the Obama-era Clean Power Plan.

“Americans have a right to know if special interests are unduly influencing public policy decisions that have profound implications for public health, the environment, and the economy,” the senators write in their letters obtained by McClatchy.

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The letters were sent to administration officials including President Trump, Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott PruittEdward (Scott) Scott PruittCourt sets in motion EPA ban on pesticide linked to developmental issues Scientific integrity, or more hot air? OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Biden proposes billions for electric vehicles, building retrofitting| EPA chief to replace Trump appointees on science advisory panels | Kerry to travel to UAE, India to discuss climate change MORE and Interior Secretary Ryan ZinkeRyan Keith ZinkeThe Hill's Morning Report - Biden launches blitz for jobs plan with 'thank you, Georgia' OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Court sets in motion EPA ban on pesticide linked to developmental issues | Trump Interior Secretary Zinke files to run for Congress, again | Senate passes bipartisan B water infrastructure bill Trump Interior Secretary Zinke files to run for Congress, again MORE.

A spokesman for the Koch network told McClatchy that the network is transparent about the efforts it backs and that they’ll “work with anyone to make progress on these issues.”

“This is emblematic of whats wrong with Washington. People playing political games rather than coming together and solving issues,” the spokesperson said.

The White House did not respond to McClatchy’s request for comment.

The Kochs did not back Trump during the 2016 presidential race but have supported top Trump administration officials, including Vice President Pence and Pruitt.

White House counselor Kellyanne ConwayKellyanne Elizabeth ConwayPence urges 'positive' agenda to counter Biden in first speech since leaving office Kellyanne Conway joins Ohio Senate candidate's campaign Mark Zuckerberg, meet Jean-Jacques Rousseau? MORE, White House counsel Don McGahn and legislative affairs director Marc Short all previously worked for the Koch network.