Impeaching Rosenstein? Some Republicans are talking about it

Impeaching Rosenstein? Some Republicans are talking about it
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GOP leaders have been silent on the calls from key House conservatives to censure or impeach Deputy Attorney General Rod RosensteinRod RosensteinMueller to testify publicly on July 17 Trump: Appointing Sessions was my biggest mistake Trump blasts Mueller, decries 'witch hunt' at 2020 launch MORE — a move that would fire up the GOP base, but could also turn off moderate and independent voters in the midterm elections.

In recent weeks, leading conservatives have been aggressively ramping up their threats to impeach or hold Rosenstein in contempt of Congress over a stalled request for documents — and the release of former FBI Director James ComeyJames Brien ComeyBiden is the least electable candidate — here's why Top Mueller prosecutor Andrew Weissmann lands book deal Trump to appear on 'Meet the Press' for first time as president MORE’s memos seems unlikely to quiet them.

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“Rosenstein has a number of other issues, and that’s really getting documents to Congress that we’ve asked for,” Rep. Mark MeadowsMark Randall MeadowsHouse panel votes to subpoena Kellyanne Conway over Hatch Act testimony Jared Kushner, Ivanka Trump to appear at fundraiser for Jim Jordan: report GOP moves to block provision banning use of Defense funds for border wall MORE (R-N.C.), chairman of the House Freedom Caucus, told CNN’s Wolf Blitzer on Thursday. “He needs to get serious about that.”

Meadows said he doesn’t think special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerTop Republican considered Mueller subpoena to box in Democrats Kamala Harris says her Justice Dept would have 'no choice' but to prosecute Trump for obstruction Dem committees win new powers to investigate Trump MORE’s job is in jeopardy, but “Rod Rosenstein is a little bit more ambiguous, in terms of his future with this administration.”

The effort to take aim at Justice Department (DOJ) officials could put Republican leaders in a tough spot, especially as they seek to protect vulnerable House members in the midterms.

Democrats are painting the conservative attacks on Rosenstein as an effort to lay the groundwork for President TrumpDonald John Trump2020 Democrats spar over socialism ahead of first debate Senate passes .5 billion border bill, setting up fight with House 'Teflon Don' avoids the scorn of the 'family values' GOP — again MORE to fire top Justice officials or Mueller.

“We now live in a time when the administration appears to be actively coordinating with members of the majority to stymie Congressional and DOJ investigations,” Rep. Jerrold Nadler (D-N.Y.), the ranking member on the House Judiciary Committee, said in a statement. “We need to do everything in our power to protect the integrity and independence of the Department of Justice.”

 
Ryan, who is retiring, has said in the past that Mueller’s job is not in jeopardy and that the special counsel should be allowed to carry out its mission.

“I think they should be allowed to do their jobs,” Ryan told reporters at a news conference last week, referring to Mueller and Rosenstein.

On the one hand, Congress taking aim at Rosenstein would throw some red meat to the conservative base and please critics of the department’s Russia investigation. That could help close an expected enthusiasm gap between Republicans and Democrats in the midterm elections.

But moderate and vulnerable GOP lawmakers may be wary to take any action that could be construed as an attempt to undermine the special counsel.

Leaders of the far-right House Freedom Caucus have been blanketing the cable airwaves in recent weeks with their attacks on the Justice Department and FBI, which they claim have been biased and politically motivated in the investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election.

They are infuriated that the Justice Department has slow-walked a request from Congress to produce a tranche of documents that touch on a range of issues, including the investigation surrounding former Secretary of State Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham Clinton'Teflon Don' avoids the scorn of the 'family values' GOP — again Don't expect Trump-sized ratings for Democratic debates Ocasio-Cortez on Biden: 'I think that he's not a pragmatic choice' MORE’s private email server and how the department has used the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act.

Judiciary Chairman Bob Goodlatte (R-Va.) slapped a subpoena on the Justice Department to force officials to turn over 1.2 million pages of documents by April 5.

But the department failed to comply with that deadline, and has so far only turned over a few thousand documents, some of which have been heavily redacted.

The department has since taken steps to help speed up its response to the congressional request, including appointing a United States attorney to help produce more documents.

Meadows and Rep. Jim JordanJames (Jim) Daniel JordanHouse panel votes to subpoena Kellyanne Conway over Hatch Act testimony TSA to send hundreds of workers to southern border to enforce immigration policies Jared Kushner, Ivanka Trump to appear at fundraiser for Jim Jordan: report MORE (R-Ohio) reportedly met with Rosenstein on Monday, a few days before the Justice Department ended up releasing memos written by Comey, which Trump and his GOP allies were also seeking.

If the DOJ doesn’t move more quickly or continues to hand over heavily redacted documents, Rosenstein could face impeachment proceedings or attempts to hold him in contempt of Congress, Meadows and others warn.

“Rod Rosenstein’s real problem right now is more with Congress than the president,” said Meadows, who ticked off a list of grievances. “He needs to get serious about responding to congressional requests in days, not in weeks or months.”

“We will have a plan to hold in contempt and impeach,” Rep. Devin NunesDevin Gerald NunesGOP consultant sued by Nunes asks for help paying legal costs Hillicon Valley: Hacker group targeted electric grid | House Democrats press CBP over facial recognition program | Senators offer bill to protect health data | Groups file FCC complaint over carriers' use of location data Lawmakers grapple with deepfake threat at hearing MORE (R-Calif.), chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, told Fox News last week.

Either motion would require the support of GOP leaders, who decide what comes to the House floor.

It’s unclear, however, whether there’s much appetite in the wider GOP conference for targeting Justice officials — especially as speculation swirls about whether Trump will shake up DOJ leadership after the FBI’s raid on his personal lawyer earlier this month, which Rosenstein reportedly signed off on.

Some Republicans fear that the firing of Mueller, Rosenstein or Attorney General Jeff Sessions would cause chaos in Washington, spark a constitutional crisis and dim Republican hopes of holding their congressional majorities.

Over half of Republicans, or 55 percent, believe that Trump should not fire Mueller, according to a Quinnipiac University poll conducted earlier this month. Meanwhile, 69 percent of independents and 82 percent of Democrats feel the same way.

In a sign that some Republicans may be worried how the issue will play out in November, two of the GOP’s most vulnerable members — Reps. Leonard LanceLeonard LancePush for ‘Medicare for all’ worries centrist Dems Incoming Dem lawmaker: Trump 'sympathizes' with leaders 'accused of moral transgressions' On The Money: Why the tax law failed to save the GOP majority | Grassley opts for Finance gavel, setting Graham up for Judiciary | Trump says China eager for trade deal | Facebook reeling after damning NYT report MORE (N.J.) and Brian FitzpatrickBrian K. FitzpatrickThe four House Democrats who voted against the border funding bill Overnight Defense: House passes T spending package with defense funds | Senate set to vote on blocking Saudi arms sales | UN nominee defends climate change record Addressing climate change is a win for Republicans — why not embrace it? MORE (Pa.) — have both signed on to House legislation designed to protect the special counsel.

“I am a supporter of the Mueller investigation ... It's important that the Mueller [probe] continue,” Lance told CNN’s Don Lemon this week. “I hold town hall meetings regularly, and my constituents want to get to the bottom of how the Russians were involved in tampering with our elective process.”

But, Lance added, Rosenstein’s ouster wouldn’t necessarily spell doom for the special counsel.

“The Mueller investigation would continue, and if someone were to be nominated to be deputy attorney general, that position requires Senate confirmation,” he said.