Trump's former VA pick won't return as his personal physician: report

Navy Rear Adm. Ronny Jackson will reportedly not return to his role as President TrumpDonald John TrumpCould Donald Trump and Boris Johnson be this generation's Reagan-Thatcher? Merkel backs Democratic congresswomen over Trump How China's currency manipulation cheats America on trade MORE's personal physician after he withdrew his nomination for Veterans Affairs (VA) secretary following numerous allegations of improper behavior.

Two senior White House officials told Politico that Jackson will not continue on as Trump's doctor, and will be permanently replaced by Sean Conley, a Navy officer who had filled in for Jackson last month.

The Hill has reached out to the White House for comment. 

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Jackson, who also served as White House physician under former Presidents Obama and George W. Bush, was tapped by Trump to serve as the VA secretary following the dismissal of the agency's previous head, David ShulkinDavid Jonathon ShulkinPress: Acosta, latest to walk the plank Senior Trump administration official to leave post next week Trump sent policy pitch from Mar-a-Lago member to VA secretary: report MORE.

He withdrew his nomination last week amid accusations of drinking on the job, improperly handing out prescription drugs and multiple drunken incidents, including one in which he allegedly crashed a government vehicle.

Jackson has denied the allegations, as have the White House and Secret Service.

The White House said after his withdrawal that Jackson would continue to work at the White House Medical Unit.

Sen. Jon TesterJonathan (Jon) TesterPoll: McConnell is most unpopular senator Trump nominees meet fiercest opposition from Warren, Sanders, Gillibrand The Hill's 12:30 Report: Pelosi looks to squash fight with progressives MORE (D-Mont.) released a report last week containing some of the allegations against Jackson. The report was based on interviews with more than 20 current and former colleagues, Tester said.

Trump, who said when the allegations first surfaced that he would understand if Jackson withdrew his nomination, has since set his sights on Tester.

The president has said Tester deserves to lose his reelection bid in November for sharing allegations about Jackson, and on Saturday implied he could spread allegations about the Montana senator that would cost him the election.

Tester has defended releasing the list of allegations, saying he wants to ensure a qualified individual is appointed to run the VA.

“It’s not political," Tester told reporters late last week. "I’m focused on making sure we have the best person possible to run the VA. It’s a very, very important agency. We’ve been at war for 17 years. Our veterans deserve to have what they were promised."

— Updated at 5:43 p.m.