Rosenstein tells graduates: 'Take ownership of the consequential decisions'

Deputy Attorney General Rod RosensteinRod RosensteinTrump attacks Sessions: A 'total disaster' and 'an embarrassment to the great state of Alabama' Mueller rejoins DC law firm Lewandowski says Mueller report was 'very clear' in proving 'there was no obstruction,' despite having 'never' read it MORE advised a group of graduating law students on Friday to "take ownership of the consequential decisions" that they face and "conduct your own affairs with integrity."

"There is no point in wasting your time complaining about the random events. The key to living a life of integrity is to take ownership of the consequential decisions," Rosenstein said in a commencement address at Campbell University Law School in Raleigh, N.C.

He also urged the students to defend "the rule of law," saying that, as lawyers, they have an obligation to "speak up for the truth."

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"You are responsible for defending the rule of law," he said. "If you fail, do not expect me or anyone else to do it for you."

Rosenstein himself has faced a series of difficult decisions in his tenure as deputy attorney general.

After Attorney General Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsTrump attacks Sessions: A 'total disaster' and 'an embarrassment to the great state of Alabama' Ocasio-Cortez fires back at Washington Times after story on her 'high-dollar hairdo' Trump's tirades, taunts and threats are damaging our democracy MORE recused himself from the investigation into possible collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia last year, Rosenstein took on responsibility for the probe. 

Shortly after President TrumpDonald John TrumpFlorida GOP lawmaker says he's 'thinking' about impeachment Democrats introduce 'THUG Act' to block funding for G-7 at Trump resort Kurdish group PKK pens open letter rebuking Trump's comparison to ISIS MORE fired former FBI Director James ComeyJames Brien ComeyState cites 38 people for violations in Clinton email review GOP cautions Graham against hauling Biden before Senate Graham on Syria: Trump appears 'hell-bent' on repeating Obama's mistakes in Iraq MORE, based on the recommendations of Sessions and Rosenstein, the deputy attorney general appointed former FBI Director Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerFox News legal analyst says Trump call with Ukraine leader could be 'more serious' than what Mueller 'dragged up' Lewandowski says Mueller report was 'very clear' in proving 'there was no obstruction,' despite having 'never' read it Fox's Cavuto roasts Trump over criticism of network MORE as special counsel to oversee the Russia investigation.

Trump has bristled privately and publicly at Mueller's investigation, and speculation has swirled in recent months that the president could dismiss Rosenstein or Mueller.

Speaking to students on Friday, Rosenstein emphasized the importance of acting with "integrity, so you will never need to look back with regret."

"Wherever life takes you, conduct your own affairs with integrity, so you will never need to look back with regret," he said.