Director of federal prisons resigns after clashes with Kushner, Sessions: report

Director of federal prisons resigns after clashes with Kushner, Sessions: report
© Greg Nash

The director of the Federal Bureau of Prisons reportedly resigned last week amid tensions with senior White House adviser Jared KushnerJared Corey KushnerOn The Money: Judge upholds House subpoena for Trump financial records | Trump vows to appeal ruling by 'Obama-appointed judge' | Canada, Mexico lift retaliatory tariffs on US | IRS audit rate falls The Hill's 12:30 Report: Amash under fire after impeachment tweets Ann Coulter: Four myths the media and politicians tell you about our border crisis MORE and Attorney General Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsMSNBC host: Barr 'the most dangerous person' who works for Trump Chris Wallace: AG Barr 'clearly is protecting' Trump Appeals court rules Trump end of DACA was unlawful MORE.

The New York Times reported Thursday that Mark Inch submitted his resignation while complaining that Kushner and Sessions had cut him out of major decisions and flouted “departmental norms.”

Sessions hired Inch last August, praising the retired Army major general’s qualifications for the role. 

However, Inch allegedly struggled to navigate his position as Kushner and Sessions each pushed for their preferred reforms to the prison system.

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Inch was reportedly left out of budget decisions and was in the dark on discussions about the prison reform bill that passed the House this week.

In addition, Inch was reportedly rebuffed by Sessions when he attempted to hire his preferred personnel for his team.

Prison reform has been one of several initiatives that Kushner has added to his portfolio of responsibilities.

The White House hosted a summit last Friday on the issue where President TrumpDonald John TrumpThe Hill's Morning Report - White House, Congress: Urgency of now around budget GOP presses Trump to make a deal on spending Democrats wary of handing Trump a win on infrastructure MORE said he would sign a prison-reform bill if it passed Congress.

The House-passed legislation, which is supported by the administration but faces an uncertain future in the Senate, would allow prisoners to earn time credits for completing programs, and then use those credits to serve the remaining days of their sentences in a halfway house or home confinement.

The bill also requires inmates to be housed within 500 miles of their families when possible and prohibits the shackling of female inmates while they are pregnant, giving birth or in postpartum recovery.