Trump doubles down, says he has 'absolute right to pardon myself'

Trump doubles down, says he has 'absolute right to pardon myself'

President TrumpDonald John TrumpPapadopoulos on AG's new powers: 'Trump is now on the offense' Pelosi uses Trump to her advantage Mike Pence delivers West Point commencement address MORE on Friday doubled down on his claim that he can pardon himself for any potential crimes but insisted that he would not have to because he hasn't broken the law.

"I have an absolute right to pardon myself," Trump told reporters outside the White House before departing for the G-7 summit. 

Trump's comments marked the second time in a matter of days that he asserted his right to pardon himself in the event that he is charged with an offense.

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He made the same assertion in a tweet on Monday.

“As has been stated by numerous legal scholars, I have the absolute right to PARDON myself, but why would I do that when I have done nothing wrong?” he tweeted.

“In the meantime, the never ending Witch Hunt, led by 13 very Angry and Conflicted Democrats (& others) continues into the mid-terms!” 

Trump's claim backs up an argument his lawyers made to special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerThe Hill's 12:30 Report: Trump orders more troops to Mideast amid Iran tensions Trump: Democrats just want Mueller to testify for a 'do-over' Graham: Mueller investigation a 'political rectal exam' MORE in a January letter, in which they asserted that the president could simply terminate the investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 election if he wanted.

House Speaker Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanAmash storm hits Capitol Hill Debate with Donald Trump? Just say no Ex-Trump adviser says GOP needs a better health-care message for 2020 MORE (R-Wis.) on Wednesday pushed back on Trump's assertion that he could pardon himself, declaring that "no one is above the law."

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellThe Hill's 12:30 Report: Trump orders more troops to Mideast amid Iran tensions What if 2020 election is disputed? Immigration bills move forward amid political upheaval MORE (R-Ky.) also commented, saying on Tuesday that Trump should not pardon himself, but also waved off such a scenario as unlikely.