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CBS: Sanders may leave White House at end of year

White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders is planning to leave the White House at the end of the year, CBS News reported Wednesday, citing sources in the administration.

Sanders has reportedly told friends about her plans to depart the Trump administration. Deputy press secretary Raj Shah is also reportedly eyeing a White House exit, but has not yet decided on a departure date.

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Sanders did not deny the report in a tweet sent roughly an hour after the report was published.

"Does @CBSNews know something I don’t about my plans and my future? I was at my daughter’s year-end Kindergarten event and they ran a story about my 'plans to leave the WH' without even talking to me. I love my job and am honored to work for @POTUS," Sanders tweeted.

Both officials are among the most visible members of the Trump administration.

Sanders worked on the Trump campaign, and initially worked in the White House as deputy press secretary under then-press secretary Sean SpicerSean Michael Spicer'A Warning' replaces Donald Trump Jr.'s 'Triggered' as No.1 book on NYT bestseller list Sarah Sanders defends Trump: He reads 'more than anybody I know' The Hill's Morning Report - Witness transcripts plow ground for public impeachment testimony MORE. She took over as press secretary when Spicer resigned in July of last year.

Shah worked for the Republican National Committee during the 2016 campaign season, and later joined the Trump administration.

Sanders and Shah would be the latest communications staffers to depart the White House.

Communications director Anthony ScaramucciAnthony ScaramucciScaramucci: 'Trump fatigue' could help Bloomberg beat Trump if he wins Democratic nomination Will Republicans continue to engage in willful blindness? Scaramucci: Trump sees Bloomberg as threat MORE was fired after a brief stint in the administration last summer. His successor, Hope HicksHope Charlotte HicksJustice Dept releases another round of summaries from Mueller probe Former White House official won't testify, lawyer says Trump: 'Top shows' on Fox News, cable are 'Fair (or great)' to me MORE, resigned earlier this year.

Other communications aides have left the administration in recent weeks amid an effort to crackdown on leaks. Among other leaks that have plagued the White House, The Hill reported last month on a comment made during an internal meeting where a staffer joked about Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainJeffries blasts Trump for attack on Thunberg at impeachment hearing Live coverage: House panel debates articles of impeachment Budowsky: Would John McCain back impeachment? MORE's (R-Ariz.) brain cancer.

The White House has had a combative relationship with the media, with the president frequently labeling certain outlets "fake news." Sanders has vowed that the administration is "committed to a free press."

Reporters have grilled Sanders on multiple instances in which she made statements from the White House podium that were later proven to be false. She has attributed the mistakes to lacking the correct information at the time, though she recently declined to address such questions entirely.

She has also been forced to defend her credibility in recent weeks, claiming it's "probably higher than the media's."

In a June 6 interview with CNN, Sanders was asked whether she's enjoying her job.

"I am, and even in moments when I come on CNN, because I love our country," she told Chris Cuomo.

"And you're OK with how you're doing it?" Cuomo asked.

"I mean, I think things are going pretty well. Again, I think that the country is moving in the right direction and it's doing that under the president's leadership," she responded.

"And I'm proud to be a part of that," she continued. "And I think some really great things have happened over these first 500 days. And I think a lot of great things are going to take place over the next six and a half years."

Updated at 8:57 p.m.