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Trump wanted to move up North Korea summit at the last minute: report

Trump wanted to move up North Korea summit at the last minute: report
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President TrumpDonald TrumpSunday shows preview: House GOP removes Cheney from leadership position; CDC issues new guidance for fully vaccinated Americans Navajo Nation president on Arizona's new voting restrictions: An 'assault' on our rights The Memo: Lawmakers on edge after Greene's spat with Ocasio-Cortez MORE reportedly sought to push up his meeting with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un after arriving in Singapore two days before it was scheduled to take place.

The Washington Post reported that Trump grew bored as he waited for the summit on Tuesday and wanted to move it up to Monday, until his aides eventually talked him into sticking to the schedule.

"We’re here now," Trump reportedly said as he waited for the summit. "Why can’t we just do it?"

Kim had also arrived in Singapore early in anticipation of the meeting. 

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Trump was eventually convinced to stick to the original plan by Secretary of State Mike PompeoMike PompeoSunday shows preview: House GOP removes Cheney from leadership position; CDC issues new guidance for fully vaccinated Americans US Olympic Committee urges Congress not to boycott Games in China Pompeo on CIA recruitment: We can't risk national security to appease 'liberal, woke agenda' MORE and White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders, who advised him to use the time before the summit to prepare, the Post reported.

Sanders and Pompeo also reportedly told Trump that if he pushed the meeting up, it may not get the kind of high-profile media coverage in the U.S. it would get otherwise. 

Trump traveled to Singapore on Saturday, earlier than expected, after he engaged in a bitter feud with foreign leaders at the Group of Seven summit in Canada over his decision to impose tariffs on steel and aluminum imports. 

The decision to push up his departure from Canada came after he waged a war of words with French President Emmanuel Macron and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, who had criticized the tariffs. 

The early departure was widely seen as a snub to some of the United States' closest allies.