Jeb Bush: Trump should end 'heartless' policy separating migrant families

Jeb Bush: Trump should end 'heartless' policy separating migrant families
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Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush (R) on Monday said President TrumpDonald John TrumpRosenstein expected to leave DOJ next month: reports Allies wary of Shanahan's assurances with looming presence of Trump States file lawsuit seeking to block Trump's national emergency declaration MORE should stop his administration’s “heartless” zero-tolerance immigration policy, which has resulted in children being separated from their parents.

Bush, who unsuccessfully ran for president in 2016, also said Congress should pass an immigration law that addresses issues raised by both Democrats and Republicans. 

“Children shouldn’t be used as a negotiating tool. @realDonaldTrump should end this heartless policy and Congress should get an immigration deal done that provides for asylum reform, border security and a path to citizenship for Dreamers,” Bush tweeted.”

Bush’s comments came shortly after Trump tweeted that criminals were using children to enter the U.S.

The Trump administration announced last month a “zero tolerance” immigration policy that leads federal agents to aggressively prosecute adults caught trying to cross the U.S.-Mexico border illegally. As a result of the policy, thousands of migrant children have been separated from their parents when caught crossing the border.

Attorney General Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsRosenstein expected to leave DOJ next month: reports McCabe: Trump's 'relentless attack' on FBI prompted memoir Trump: 'Disgraced' McCabe, Rosenstein look like they were planning 'very illegal act' MORE said the policy would likely lead to more separations but also said it would deter future immigrants from trying to cross the southern border.

The practice has been widely criticized by Democrats and Republicans.

Trump has tried to blame Democrats for his administration’s policy, but has refused to cooperate with Democrats to eliminate the practice. Administration officials meanwhile have continued to defend the policy.

On Sunday, former first lady Laura Bush slammed the policy, calling it "cruel" and "immoral."