Trump says he will sign executive order to end family separations

President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump opens new line of impeachment attack for Democrats Bloomberg to spend 0M on anti-Trump ads in battleground states New witness claims first-hand account of Trump's push for Ukraine probes MORE on Wednesday said he will sign an “executive order” intended to end his administration's controversial practice of separating children from their parents who illegally cross the southern border.

“We want to keep families together. It’s very important. I’ll be signing something in a little while that’s going to do that,” Trump told reporters during a meeting with Republican lawmakers at the White House.

Details about the order remain unknown, but Trump said he would be signing the document before leaving for a Wednesday night campaign rally in Duluth, Minn. 

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The move would be a major reversal for Trump and comes after the president and his top aides insisted for days that only Congress could halt family separations at the border, despite members of both parties saying Trump could unilaterally change the policy.

Trump said during a speech on Tuesday that congressional action is the “only solution to the border crisis.”

“Congress and the courts created this problem, and Congress alone can fix it,” Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen NielsenKirstjen Michele NielsenTop House Democrats ask for review of DHS appointments Chad Wolf becomes acting DHS secretary Senate paves way for Trump's next DHS chief MORE said on Monday.

But fierce criticism of the president’s family separation policy has continued to build nationally and even globally, with Pope Francis calling it “contrary to our Catholic values” and “immoral.”

Republicans and Democrats in Congress have been scrambling to draft legislation aimed at keeping families together, even as they urged the president to change his administration’s policy on his own. 

“President Trump could stop this policy with a phone call,” Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamGOP eager for report on alleged FBI surveillance abuse Johnson opens door to subpoenaing whistleblower, Schiff, Bidens Overnight Defense: Erdoğan gets earful from GOP senators | Amazon to challenge Pentagon cloud contract decision in court | Lawmakers under pressure to pass benefits fix for military families MORE (R-S.C.) said on CNN last Friday. “If you don’t like families being separated, you can tell DHS, ‘stop doing it.’”

Trump said Wednesday he wanted to push lawmakers to adopt more restrictive immigration policies, such as border-wall funding and cuts to legal immigration, but complained Democrats would not agree. 

“We’re having a lot of problems with Democrats,” he said. “They don’t want to vote for anything. They don’t care about lack of security. They really would like to have open borders where anybody in the world can just flow in, including from the Middle East.”  

House GOP leaders, who were struggling to secure the votes for a compromise immigration bill that addresses the family-separation issue, kicked their whip operation into high-gear as they worked to sell wavering members on the plan. 
 
Majority Whip Steve ScaliseStephen (Steve) Joseph ScaliseLive updates on impeachment: Schiff fires warning at GOP over whistleblower Bottom Line Trump allies assail impeachment on process while House Democrats promise open hearings soon MORE (R-La.) gave Trump a list of undecided members that the president needs to work with personally on the legislation. Those members were then hauled to the White House in vans for a meeting on Wednesday afternoon, accompanied by Speaker Paul RyanPaul Davis Ryan Retirees should say 'no thanks' to Romney's Social Security plan California Governor Newsom and family dress as 2020 Democrats for Halloween DC's liaison to rock 'n' roll MORE (R-Wis.) and his leadership team.
 
The group included Reps. Frank LucasFrank Dean LucasHillicon Valley: Amazon to challenge Pentagon cloud contract in court | State antitrust investigation into Google expands | Intel agencies no longer collecting location data without warrant Bipartisan bill to secure election tech advances to House floor Hillicon Valley: Doctors press tech to crack down on anti-vax content | Facebook, Instagram suffer widespread outages | Spotify hits Apple with antitrust complaint | FCC rejects calls to delay 5G auction MORE (R-Okla.), Kristi NoemKristi Lynn NoemSouth Dakota drops pipeline protest laws after lawsuit New South Dakota law requiring 'In God We Trust' sign to hang in public schools goes into effect Trump: If I say I should be on Mt. Rushmore, 'I will end up with such bad publicity' MORE (R-S.D.) and George HoldingGeorge Edward Bell HoldingNorth Carolina poised to pass new congressional maps North Carolina ruling could cost GOP House seats House committee advances measure taxing nicotine in vaping products MORE (R-N.C.).
 
Trump spoke shortly after Nielsen arrived at the White House amid reports the administration was weighing an executive order to end the practice of separating families.

The order reportedly being drafted by Nielsen would direct the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) to keep families together in detention while they await hearings before immigration judges. 

The White House also signaled earlier Wednesday that Trump is open to signing a narrow piece of legislation that would end the family separations. But it’s not clear if Congress has the votes to pass any piece of legislation, a dynamic that caused the president to act. 

“There was hope that one of the immigration bills in the House would move and solve the current issue but due to the urgency of the situation, it was determined an [executive] action was warranted,” said a White House official who requested anonymity to explain internal thinking. 

The plans, however, remain fluid and it is unclear the directive he plans to sign is the one drafted by Nielsen or a different document. 

Since the Trump administration in April announced its “zero-tolerance” policy on illegal immigration, DHS says roughly 2,000 children have been separated from their adult guardians and placed in detention centers while the adults await prosecution for illegally crossing the border.

News reports have been dominated by images of children being kept in cages inside the facilities near the border and an audio recording emerged on Monday of young kids crying and asking for their parents. 

The near-constant coverage has generated more outrage and pressure on the president to change course. 

Trump earlier Wednesday hinted at pending action, tweeting, “I am working on something - it never ends!” 

Lawmakers from both parties have spoken out against family separation, calling it “cruel” and “inhumane.” Some Democrats have called for Nielsen to resign for enforcing the policy.

Members of both parties have crafted legislation aimed specifically at ending family separation at the border, though it’s unclear if any measure garner enough support to pass through Congress.

The House on Thursday is expected to vote on two other immigration bills. The president met with House Republicans late Tuesday and told them he would sign either measure.

Trump appeared to surprise lawmakers when he said he would postpone a picnic for them and their families at the White House scheduled for Thursday while they sort out the immigration issue. 

“We want to see if we can solve it, so we’re cancelling or postponing the congressional picnic tomorrow,” Trump said. 

As the announcement was made, White House cooks were preparing steaks on large grills just outside the West Wing.

The president on Tuesday night spoke at a fundraiser for the pro-Trump super PAC America First Action. Donors paid at least $100,000 to attend the event at the Trump International Hotel in Washington. 

– Brett Samuels, Melanie Zanona and Niall Stanage contributed to this report, which was updated at 1:31 p.m.