Conservatives moving to impeach Rosenstein soon: report

Conservative lawmakers in the House are preparing to impeach Deputy Attorney General Rod RosensteinRod RosensteinTrump attacks Sessions: A 'total disaster' and 'an embarrassment to the great state of Alabama' Mueller rejoins DC law firm Lewandowski says Mueller report was 'very clear' in proving 'there was no obstruction,' despite having 'never' read it MORE, Politico reported Friday.

Sources told the publication that conservatives have been preparing to have Rosenstein impeached for weeks over allegations that he’s held up their investigation into FBI agents who some lawmakers say are biased against President TrumpDonald John TrumpWarren defends, Buttigieg attacks in debate that shrank the field Five takeaways from the Democratic debate in Ohio Democrats debate in Ohio: Who came out on top? MORE.

House Freedom Caucus leaders Reps. Mark MeadowsMark Randall MeadowsEx-Ukraine ambassador arrives to give testimony GOP seeks to gain more control of impeachment narrative Conservative lawmakers demand Schiff's recusal from Trump impeachment inquiry MORE (R-N.C.) and Jim JordanJames (Jim) Daniel JordanTop State Department official arrives for testimony in impeachment probe 10 top Republicans who continue to deny the undeniable Ex-Trump aide to tell Congress she objected to Ukrainian ambassador's removal: report MORE (R-Ohio) are leading the effort, and the impeachment document could be filed as soon as Monday, according to Politico.

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Ben Williamson, a spokesman for Meadows, declined to rule out if it would be filed next week, Politico reported.

The news comes the same day that Rosenstein announced charges against 12 Russian intelligence officials for allegedly hacking the Democratic National Committee.

Rosenstein has long been a target for Republicans who are frustrated over special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerFox News legal analyst says Trump call with Ukraine leader could be 'more serious' than what Mueller 'dragged up' Lewandowski says Mueller report was 'very clear' in proving 'there was no obstruction,' despite having 'never' read it Fox's Cavuto roasts Trump over criticism of network MORE’s probe into election meddling by Russia and possible collusion between Moscow and the Trump campaign. He is overseeing the probe after Attorney General Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsTrump attacks Sessions: A 'total disaster' and 'an embarrassment to the great state of Alabama' Ocasio-Cortez fires back at Washington Times after story on her 'high-dollar hairdo' Trump's tirades, taunts and threats are damaging our democracy MORE recused himself from the Russia investigation, and some argue that he's the only person with the legal authority to fire Mueller.

The deputy attorney general testified before the House Judiciary Committee in a tense hearing last month, with Republicans grilling him over the Mueller probe.

Speculation that Trump could fire Rosenstein increased in April after the FBI raided the home and office of Trump’s former personal lawyer Michael Cohen.

Trump later responded to news reports that he may fire Mueller or Rosenstein by noting that “they’re still here.”