Putin summit puts spotlight back on Trump's tax returns

President TrumpDonald John TrumpJoint Chiefs chairman denies report that US is planning to keep 1K troops in Syria Kansas Department of Transportation calls Trump 'delusional communist' on Twitter Trump has privately voiced skepticism about driverless cars: report MORE’s tax returns are back in the spotlight after his private one-on-one meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin.

Trump’s comments during a joint press conference with Putin on Monday alarmed lawmakers, leading some to wonder about the president’s possible financial ties to Russia.

ADVERTISEMENT

Democrats have since stepped up their calls to have Congress request Trump’s tax returns from the Treasury Department in order to learn more about the president’s finances.

“I think we have a cloud that hangs over this whole administration at this moment in time,” said Sen. Mark WarnerMark Robert WarnerLive video of New Zealand shooting puts tech on defensive The Hill's Morning Report — Trump readies first veto after latest clash with Senate GOP Senate Dem warns against Manafort pardon after sentencing MORE (Va.), the top Democrat on the Senate Intelligence Committee.

Trump broke with tradition when he became the first major-party presidential candidate in decades to refuse to release his tax returns, citing an ongoing IRS audit, even though the IRS has said audits do not prevent people from releasing their own tax information.

Lawyers for Trump said in a March 2017 letter that “with a few exceptions,” Trump’s tax returns from the previous 10 years didn’t reflect income from Russian sources, debt owed to Russian lenders or investments in Russian entities. As president-elect, Trump said at a press conference in January 2017 that he doesn't think voters care about his tax returns.

In the early months of his presidency, Democrats tried unsuccessfully several times to get him to release the returns or to have Congress request them.

Under federal law, the chairmen of the House Ways and Means Committee, Senate Finance Committee and Joint Committee on Taxation can request tax returns from the Treasury Department and then view the documents in a closed session.

The issue of Trump’s tax returns had become less prominent in recent months. But that changed following last week’s joint press conference with Putin in Helsinki, when Trump questioned the findings of the U.S. intelligence community that Russia interfered in the 2016 presidential election.

Rep. Bill PascrellWilliam (Bill) James PascrellLawmakers contemplate a tough political sell: Raising their pay New Jersey Dems tell Pentagon not to use military funds for border wall On The Money: Trump issues emergency order grounding Boeing 737 Max jets | Senate talks over emergency resolution collapse | Progressives seek defense freeze in budget talks MORE (D-N.J.), a leader of congressional efforts to get Trump’s tax returns, brought up the topic Wednesday during a Ways and Means Committee markup of Social Security legislation.

“This committee could act right now to hold this president to account,” he said. “We must know if Mr. Putin has compromised our commander in chief.”

The next day, Warner and other Democrats on the Senate Finance Committee addressed the matter when the panel was debating the nomination of Trump’s pick to lead the IRS, Charles Rettig.

Every Democrat on the committee voted against Rettig’s nomination, despite saying he’s qualified, because of concerns about new IRS guidance ending a requirement that certain tax-exempt groups disclose information about donor identities. Democrats are worried the guidance will make it easier for foreign governments to influence U.S. politics — a concern exacerbated by Trump’s recent behavior.

“The president’s refusal to adhere to a 40-year plus, bipartisan, pro-transparency tradition of releasing tax returns, after what happened this Monday, can go on no longer,” said Finance Committee ranking member Ron WydenRonald (Ron) Lee WydenKlobuchar: ObamaCare a 'missed opportunity' to address drug costs Overnight Health Care — Presented by PCMA — FDA issues proposal to limit sales of flavored e-cigs | Trump health chief gets grilling | Divisions emerge over House drug pricing bills | Dems launch investigation into short-term health plans Hillicon Valley: Doctors press tech to crack down on anti-vax content | Facebook, Instagram suffer widespread outages | Spotify hits Apple with antitrust complaint | FCC rejects calls to delay 5G auction MORE (D-Ore.).

Wyden told reporters that he plans to meet with Rettig and ask him about Trump’s tax returns and correcting the new IRS guidance.

Sen. Sheldon WhitehouseSheldon WhitehouseDems introduce bill requiring disclosure of guest logs from White House, Trump properties Sanders announces first staff hires in Iowa, New Hampshire McConnell works to freeze support for Dem campaign finance effort MORE (D-R.I.), who said Trump’s behavior around Putin couldn’t be more humiliating than if the president “had been dragged out on a leash and done pet tricks,” said viewing Trump’s tax returns could help lawmakers understand the president’s behavior.

In addition to Democrats, GOP Rep. Mark SanfordMarshall (Mark) Clement SanfordEndorsing Trump isn’t the easiest decision for some Republicans Mark Sanford warns US could see ‘Hitler-like character’ in the future House passes year-end tax package MORE (S.C.) recently reiterated his desire for the administration to make the returns public.

Sanford, who lost his primary to a Trump-backed challenger, told The Hill that it would be in the administration’s best interest to release the returns because “transparency on that front answers a lot of questions.”

“If not, people are left to wonder,” he added.

Senate Finance Committee Chairman Orrin HatchOrrin Grant HatchNY's political prosecution of Manafort should scare us all Congress must break its addiction to unjust tax extenders The FDA crackdown on dietary supplements is inadequate MORE (R-Utah) and House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Kevin BradyKevin Patrick BradySmaller tax refunds put GOP on defensive Key author of GOP tax law joins Ernst and Young Lawmakers beat lobbyists at charity hockey game MORE (R-Texas) — two lawmakers with the authority to request Trump’s returns from Treasury — continue to oppose efforts to obtain the documents.

When asked if there’s renewed interest in requesting them in light of the Helsinki summit, Brady replied, “No.”

Hatch said he “doesn’t see any real justification” for requesting Trump’s returns and doesn’t think the president’s returns would show financial ties to Russia.

That kind of stonewalling frustrates Pascrell.

“House Republicans have been complicit and have blocked over a dozen attempts to expose Trump’s personal finances to disinfecting light,” he said in a statement to The Hill. “But I’m undeterred. I’ll stay locked on the Trump tax returns like a junkyard dog until we see them.”

Democrats could benefit politically from focusing on Trump’s tax returns. A Quinnipiac University poll from February found that two-thirds of voters think the president should make his returns public.

“It is a good issue for Democrats to highlight because there is a strong desire to see what is in Trump’s tax returns,” said Tim Hogan, spokesman for Not One Penny, a liberal group focused on tax reform.

If Democrats win control of at least one chamber of Congress in the November midterm elections, they would have the ability to request Trump’s returns from the Treasury Department. But right now it’s unclear whether they would do so.

Wyden said he wasn’t going to speculate on whether he would make the request if he becomes chairman. The top Democrat on the Ways and Means Committee, Rep. Richard NealRichard Edmund NealJust one in five expect savings from Trump tax law: poll On The Money: Senate rejects border declaration in rebuke to Trump | Dems press Mnuchin on Trump tax returns | Waters says Wells Fargo should fire its CEO Dems press Mnuchin on Trump tax returns MORE (Mass.), said in a statement that he’s currently focused on other issues, such as lowering health-care costs and providing the middle class with tax relief.

“There will be plenty of time in the future to determine if this course of action is necessary, but Democrats want to ensure that committee time and resources are always being used for the people, to better the lives of the American family,” he said.

But there’s one person who may already have a copy of Trump’s tax returns: special counsel Robert MuellerRobert Swan MuellerSasse: US should applaud choice of Mueller to lead Russia probe MORE.

There has been some speculation in the press about whether Mueller has a copy of Trump’s returns as part of his investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election. A spokesman for the special counsel’s office declined to comment.

Steven Cash, an attorney at Day Pitney and former chief counsel to Sen. Dianne FeinsteinDianne Emiel FeinsteinOvernight Health Care — Presented by PCMA — FDA issues proposal to limit sales of flavored e-cigs | Trump health chief gets grilling | Divisions emerge over House drug pricing bills | Dems launch investigation into short-term health plans The Hill's Morning Report - Boeing crisis a test for Trump administration Trump faces growing pressure over Boeing safety concerns MORE (D-Calif.), said he wouldn’t be surprised if Mueller has obtained Trump’s returns.

Cash said that if Mueller “has determined that the tax returns are relevant and appropriate, he would have taken the legal steps to get them and would have them now.”