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Dems suspect Russia in new Facebook influence operation

Dems suspect Russia in new Facebook influence operation
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Democrats are pointing the finger at Russia over Facebook’s new disclosure of a political influence campaign ahead of the midterm elections.

The social media giant disclosed Tuesday that it had removed 32 pages and accounts on Facebook and Instagram linked to a coordinated political influence campaign, uncovered through its broader investigation into election interference triggered by Russian meddling in 2016.

And while Facebook hasn’t been definitive in blaming Russian actors for the new campaign, Democrats aren’t being shy about attributing the effort to Moscow.

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Sen. Mark WarnerMark Robert WarnerDems can use subpoena power to reclaim the mantle of populism Is there a difference between good and bad online election targeting? Collusion judgment looms for key Senate panel MORE (Va.), the top Democrat on the Senate Intelligence Committee, said the revelation is “further evidence that the Kremlin continues to exploit platforms like Facebook to sow division and spread disinformation.”

House Intelligence Committee ranking member Adam SchiffAdam Bennett SchiffGOP targets likely Dem committee chairmen in midterm push GOP Rep to top-ranking Dem who accused him of bigotry: 'Apologize to my children' The Hill's Morning Report — Presented by the Coalition for Affordable Prescription Drugs — Trump travels to hurricane-ravaged Florida, Georgia MORE (D-Calif.) said Tuesday that the disclosure “demonstrates what we've long feared: that malicious foreign actors bearing the hallmarks of previously identified Russian influence campaigns continue to abuse and weaponize social media platforms to influence the U.S. electorate.”

Sen. Ron WydenRonald (Ron) Lee WydenOvernight Health Care — Presented by Purdue Pharma — Trump says GOP will support pre-existing condition protections | McConnell defends ObamaCare lawsuit | Dems raise new questions for HHS on child separations Republicans should prepare for Nancy Pelosi to wield the gavel US to open trade talks with Japan, EU, UK MORE (D-Ore.) said the new efforts “appear to come from the exact same playbook” as the Russian operation in 2016.

“Vladimir Putin is apparently determined to hijack Americans’ outrage against Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpThe Guardian slams Trump over comments about assault on reporter Five takeaways from the first North Dakota Senate debate Watchdog org: Tillerson used million in taxpayer funds to fly throughout US MORE and his administration for his own purposes: weakening America and ensuring that his corrupt dictatorship can act with impunity around the world,” he said.

GOP lawmakers, including Senate Intelligence Committee Chairman Richard BurrRichard Mauze BurrDems can use subpoena power to reclaim the mantle of populism Collusion judgment looms for key Senate panel The National Trails System is celebrating 50 years today — but what about the next 50 years? MORE (N.C.), were hesitant to tie the operations directly to Russia, though Burr noted vaguely in a statement that “the Russians want a weak America.”

Sen. Ben SasseBenjamin (Ben) Eric SasseGOP lawmaker on Trump's 'Horseface' comment: 'That's not the way men act' Republican senator and Sean Hannity clash over claims in new book GOP senators praise Haley as 'powerful' and 'unafraid' MORE (R-Neb.) encouraged Facebook to “continue working to quickly identify who is behind this.”

Facebook cited several instances of the influence campaign seeking to inflame divisive issues, including activity around the "Unite the Right" white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Va., last summer, according to The New York Times, which first reported on the briefings. It also detected activity related to the "AbolishICE" hashtag, a left-wing social media push to end the Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) agency.

The company said it does not have the “technical evidence” to tie the campaign to specific actors, but that it nevertheless has the hallmarks of the previous efforts of the so-called Internet Research Agency — the Russian troll farm that purchased divisive Facebook advertisements ahead of the 2016 presidential election.

Facebook briefed Congress on the new findings in advance of Tuesday’s announcement, including the Intelligence and Judiciary committees in both the House and the Senate.

It was nearly a year ago that Facebook disclosed that the Internet Research Agency purchased $100,000 in political advertisements aimed at amplifying divisive political and social issues ahead of the 2016 vote. The activity was part of a broader plot by Moscow to use cyberattacks and disinformation to interfere in the 2016 election, according to the U.S. intelligence community.

The development led to massive scrutiny of Facebook and other tech companies in Congress, where some lawmakers have pressed for more regulation around online political ads to prevent future influence efforts.

In February, special counsel Robert MuellerRobert Swan MuellerSasse: US should applaud choice of Mueller to lead Russia probe MORE indicted 13 Russians and three Russian entities on fraud charges in connection with the Russian troll farm operation.

It is unclear when, or if, Facebook will release more details on the influence effort, including those on who might be involved. The company said it is in the early stages of the investigation and is said to be working with the FBI to understand what happened.  

Lawmakers on the Senate Intelligence Committee will have the opportunity to hear about the developments on Wednesday, during a timely public hearing with testimony from experts on how foreign influence operations leverage social media platforms. No one from Facebook or other social media companies will be present at the meeting.

The Facebook announcement comes amid heightened fears Russia or another foreign actor may seek to influence the upcoming 2018 midterm elections.

Top U.S. intelligence officials have spoken publicly of evidence that Russia is actively using social media and other avenues to sow discord among the American public, though they say the efforts are not specific to certain candidates, campaigns or to the midterms.

FBI Director Christopher Wray said earlier in July that Moscow “continues to engage in malign influence operations to this day” that are “aimed at sowing discord and divisiveness in this country.”

“To me, it’s a threat that we need to take extremely seriously,” Wray said.

Ali Breland and Olivia Beavers contributed.