Ex-Trump doorman releases contract with National Enquirer publisher that silenced illegitimate child story

A former Trump Tower doorman who claimed to have information about an alleged affair of President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump: I hope voters pay attention to Dem tactics amid Kavanaugh fight South Korea leader: North Korea agrees to take steps toward denuclearization Graham calls handling of Kavanaugh allegations 'a drive-by shooting' MORE’s that he said resulted in a child is now reportedly free to speak about a deal with the National Enquirer publisher that silenced him.

An attorney for Dino Sajudin, who was employed as a doorman at Trump World Tower, told CNN that his client was "recently" released from his contract with American Media Inc. (AMI). Sajudin had entered what’s known as a “catch-and-kill” agreement with the publisher in 2015.

"Just recently, AMI released Mr. Sajudin from the terms of his agreement and he is now able to speak about his personal experience with them, as well as his story, which is now known to be one of the 'catch and kill' pieces,” the attorney, Marc Held, told CNN. “Mr. Sajudin hopes the truth will come out in the very near future."

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Sajudin claimed to have knowledge of an affair between Trump and an ex-housekeeper, which he said resulted in a child. The story about his claims and the contract was reported by The Associated Press earlier this year.

In the contract between Sajudin and AMI, a copy of which was obtained by CNN, the company obtained indefinite exclusive rights to Sajudin’s story, and barred him from breaking the contract at the penalty of $1 million. AMI never published a story on Sajudin’s claims and an executive told the AP they lacked credibility. 

The AP reported in April that Sajudin had been let out of his contract with the publisher after the 2016 election.

David Pecker, the CEO of AMI, has been granted immunity by prosecutors investigating Trump’s longtime lawyer, Michael Cohen, who last week pleaded guilty to a number of federal charges, including making or abetting campaign finance violations.

Pecker, a longtime friend of the president’s, reportedly possessed a safe full of damaging stories on Trump that the company had purchased the rights to and “killed” in the months ahead of the 2016 election.

Cohen told prosecutors that he "cause[d]" an illegal campaign contribution in 2016, around the same time that AMI, allegedly in coordination with Cohen, reportedly paid former Playboy model Karen McDougal $150,000 in a separate catch-and-kill agreement about an affair she claimed to have with Trump.

Cohen also admitted to making an "excessive" campaign contribution on the same day he arranged a $130,000 payment to adult-film star Stormy Daniels. He said that he made the payment at the request of the candidate for federal office.