Trump re-lowers flag for McCain, expresses 'respect' after backlash

President TrumpDonald TrumpKinzinger says Trump 'winning' because so many Republicans 'have remained silent' Our remote warfare counterterrorism strategy is more risk than reward Far-right rally draws small crowd, large police presence at Capitol MORE on Monday expressed "respect" for Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCain20 years after 9/11, US foreign policy still struggles for balance What the chaos in Afghanistan can remind us about the importance of protecting democracy at home 'The View' plans series of conservative women as temporary McCain replacements MORE's (R-Ariz.) public service and ordered flags to fly at half-staff following a widespread criticism of his response to the Senate icon's passing. 

"Despite our differences on policy and politics, I respect Senator John McCain’s service to our country and, in his honor, have signed a proclamation to fly the flag of the United States at half-staff until the day of his interment," Trump said in a statement released by the White House. 

Trump said he has asked Vice President Pence to speak at a memorial service for McCain at the Capitol on Friday and approved military transportation to move the senator's body from Arizona to Washington, D.C. 

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White House chief of staff John KellyJohn Francis KellyMORE, national security adviser John Bolton and Defense Secretary James MattisJames Norman Mattis20 years after 9/11, we've logged successes but the fight continues Defense & National Security — The mental scars of Afghanistan House panel advances 8B defense bill MORE will represent the administration at McCain's funeral on Sunday at the Naval Academy in Annapolis, Md. 

The president was not invited to the funeral, but former Presidents Barack ObamaBarack Hussein ObamaOur remote warfare counterterrorism strategy is more risk than reward Clinton lawyer's indictment reveals 'bag of tricks' Chelsea Manning tests positive for COVID-19 MORE and George W. Bush were both asked to deliver remarks. 

Trump faced a backlash earlier Monday after flags over the White House returned to full-staff after having been lowered over the weekend for just over a day.

The decision fueled complaints from Republicans and Democrats that Trump was not offering proper respect to McCain, who served more than three decades in the Senate after spending time as a prison of war in Vietnam. 

U.S. law requires the flag to be lowered the day a member of Congress dies and the following day. But presidents routinely keep the flag at half-staff until the funeral, a tradition Trump decided to follow in his Monday proclamation. 

McCain died Saturday at age 81 following a yearlong battle with an aggressive form of brain cancer.

Trump and the 2008 GOP presidential nominee have clashed for years, and the animosity did not let up in the days following the senator's death. 

Trump published a brief tweet on Saturday conveying his “deepest sympathies and respect" to the McCain family but did not offer any praise for the senator himself. 

Multiple media outlets reported that Trump rejected a laudatory statement from the White House praising McCain as a "hero" in favor of the tweet. 

"Our hearts and prayers are going to the family of Sen. John McCain ... and we very much appreciate everything Sen. McCain has done for our country,” Trump told a group of evangelical leaders at the White House on Monday evening, according to news reports.

Earlier in the day, Trump passed up multiple chances to personally comment on the death of McCain; he was asked four times to do so following an Oval Office announcement on trade but did not respond to questions. 

The president's response generated more than 24 hours of controversy that officials in his own party said could have been avoided. 

Flags over Congress and some federal buildings remained at half-staff on Monday, and bipartisan leaders in the Senate released a statement calling on Trump to follow suit. 

Veterans groups expressed outrage and disappointment over Trump's decision not to keep the U.S. flag at half-staff.

"On behalf of the American Legion's two million wartime veterans, I strongly urge you to make an appropriate presidential proclamation noting Senator McCain's death and legacy of service to our nation, and that our nation's flag be half-staffed throughout his internment," Denise Rohan, national commander of the American Legion, said in a statement earlier Monday. 

—Updated at 8:51 p.m.