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Poll: Nearly two-thirds say Trump should voluntarily talk to Mueller

Poll: Nearly two-thirds say Trump should voluntarily talk to Mueller
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Almost two-thirds of registered voters think President TrumpDonald TrumpCaitlyn Jenner on Hannity touts Trump: 'He was a disruptor' Ivanka Trump doubles down on vaccine push with post celebrating second shot Conservative Club for Growth PAC comes out against Stefanik to replace Cheney MORE should agree to an interview with special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) MuellerWhy a special counsel is guaranteed if Biden chooses Yates, Cuomo or Jones as AG Barr taps attorney investigating Russia probe origins as special counsel CNN's Toobin warns McCabe is in 'perilous condition' with emboldened Trump MORE, according to a USA TODAY/Suffolk University poll released Wednesday.

Of those surveyed, 63 percent say the president should sit for an interview with the special counsel, that includes nearly one-third of Republican respondents. Twenty-seven percent said the president should not do an interview.

The poll was conducted after former Trump Campaign Manager Paul Manafort was found guilty on tax and bank fraud charges and long-time Trump personal attorney Michael Cohen pleaded guilty to charges of bank and tax fraud and campaign finance violations.

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Both cases were initiated by the Mueller team. 

About 55 percent of respondents say they have a lot or some trust that Mueller’s investigation will be fair and accurate, compared to only 35 percent who say they have a lot or some trust on Trump’s denials of collusion with Russia during his campaign.

Trump has repeatedly slammed Mueller's investigation as a “witch hunt.”

Manafort faces a second trial in the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia next month on separate charges that include conspiracy, money laundering, failing to register as a foreign lobbyist and making false and misleading statements to federal agents. 

Cohen’s plea to a charge of campaign finance violations surrounds hush money payments he made during the campaign to women who allegedly had affairs with Trump. He said he did so at the direction of “a candidate for federal office.”

Despite having confidence in the Mueller probe and lacking confidence in Trump’s collusion denials, voters remain relatively split on the issue of impeachment, with 44 percent supporting and 47 percent opposing impeaching the president. 

Republicans have seized on impeachment as a way to get out the vote in the November midterm elections, claiming a Democratic-held House of Representatives would indeed begin impeachment proceedings against the president.

While a handful of Democrats have said they support such a move, leaders, such as Rep. Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiFive takeaways on the House's return to budget earmarks Pelosi mocks House GOP looking for 'non-threatening female' to replace Liz Cheney Caitlyn Jenner: California needs a 'thoughtful disruptor' MORE (D-Calif.) and Chuck SchumerChuck SchumerHow to fast-track climate action? EPA cutting super pollutant HFCs On The Money: How demand is outstripping supply and hampering recovery | Montana pulls back jobless benefits | Yellen says higher rates may be necessary Senate Democrats announce B clean bus plan MORE (D-N.Y.), have remained wary, recognizing its potential to fire up a depressed GOP base.

The poll was conducted via telephone interviews with a thousand registered voters from Aug. 23-28 and has a margin of error of plus or minus three percentage points.