Poll: Nearly two-thirds say Trump should voluntarily talk to Mueller

Poll: Nearly two-thirds say Trump should voluntarily talk to Mueller
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Almost two-thirds of registered voters think President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump's newest Russia adviser, Andrew Peek, leaves post: report Hawley expects McConnell's final impeachment resolution to give White House defense ability to motion to dismiss Trump rips New York City sea wall: 'Costly, foolish' and 'environmentally unfriendly idea' MORE should agree to an interview with special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerSchiff: Trump acquittal in Senate trial would not signal a 'failure' Jeffries blasts Trump for attack on Thunberg at impeachment hearing Live coverage: House Judiciary to vote on impeachment after surprise delay MORE, according to a USA TODAY/Suffolk University poll released Wednesday.

Of those surveyed, 63 percent say the president should sit for an interview with the special counsel, that includes nearly one-third of Republican respondents. Twenty-seven percent said the president should not do an interview.

The poll was conducted after former Trump Campaign Manager Paul Manafort was found guilty on tax and bank fraud charges and long-time Trump personal attorney Michael Cohen pleaded guilty to charges of bank and tax fraud and campaign finance violations.

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Both cases were initiated by the Mueller team. 

About 55 percent of respondents say they have a lot or some trust that Mueller’s investigation will be fair and accurate, compared to only 35 percent who say they have a lot or some trust on Trump’s denials of collusion with Russia during his campaign.

Trump has repeatedly slammed Mueller's investigation as a “witch hunt.”

Manafort faces a second trial in the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia next month on separate charges that include conspiracy, money laundering, failing to register as a foreign lobbyist and making false and misleading statements to federal agents. 

Cohen’s plea to a charge of campaign finance violations surrounds hush money payments he made during the campaign to women who allegedly had affairs with Trump. He said he did so at the direction of “a candidate for federal office.”

Despite having confidence in the Mueller probe and lacking confidence in Trump’s collusion denials, voters remain relatively split on the issue of impeachment, with 44 percent supporting and 47 percent opposing impeaching the president. 

Republicans have seized on impeachment as a way to get out the vote in the November midterm elections, claiming a Democratic-held House of Representatives would indeed begin impeachment proceedings against the president.

While a handful of Democrats have said they support such a move, leaders, such as Rep. Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiREAD: House impeachment managers' trial brief Desperate Democrats badmouth economy even as it booms Pelosi offers message to Trump on Bill Maher show: 'You are impeached forever' MORE (D-Calif.) and Chuck SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerTrump administration installs plaque marking finish of 100 miles of border wall Sanders defends vote against USMCA: 'Not a single damn mention' of climate change Schumer votes against USMCA, citing climate implications MORE (D-N.Y.), have remained wary, recognizing its potential to fire up a depressed GOP base.

The poll was conducted via telephone interviews with a thousand registered voters from Aug. 23-28 and has a margin of error of plus or minus three percentage points.