Trump says he doesn't expect government shutdown before midterms

Trump says he doesn't expect government shutdown before midterms
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President TrumpDonald John TrumpRosenstein expected to leave DOJ next month: reports Allies wary of Shanahan's assurances with looming presence of Trump States file lawsuit seeking to block Trump's national emergency declaration MORE said in an interview published Wednesday that he doesn't expect there to be a government shutdown at the end of the month over immigration funding, despite previously threatening one. 

“I don’t like the idea of shutdowns,” Trump said to The Daily Caller.

“I don’t see even myself or anybody else closing down the country right now,” he added.

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Trump earlier this summer insisted he would have no issue forcing a shutdown over immigration reform. He suggested it could be a "great campaign issue," and a "small price to pay" for changing immigration laws and securing funding for his border wall.

Trump told The Daily Caller that while he'd like to secure full funding all at once, he's already managed to begin work on the wall. He did not rule out the possibility of a shutdown following the midterm elections.

“I think that after midterms, we’re going to have a very serious discussion because we want border security," Trump said. "We have to have it."

Congress has until Sept. 30 to fund the government.

Trump will meet with GOP leaders on Wednesday to discuss the legislative agenda ahead of November's midterms, which includes avoiding a shutdown.

Speaker Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanUnscripted Trump keeps audience guessing in Rose Garden Coulter defends Paul Ryan: This is 100 percent Trump's fault The Hill's 12:30 Report — Presented by Kidney Care Partners — Trump escalates border fight with emergency declaration MORE (R-Wis.) will be in attendance at the White House meeting, according to his office, and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellDemocrats brush off GOP 'trolling' over Green New Deal Trump should beware the 'clawback' Congress Juan Williams: America needs radical solutions MORE (R-Ky.) and House Majority Whip Steve ScaliseStephen (Steve) Joseph ScaliseOn unilateral executive action, Mitch McConnell was right — in 2014 Texas man with politician hit list, illegally 3D printed rifle sentenced to eight years The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by the American Academy of HIV Medicine - Will there be any last-minute shutdown drama? MORE (R-La.) are expected to attend.

Democratic leaders were not invited to the strategy session, but there could be a bipartisan meeting on spending with congressional leaders at some point this month.

Trump has repeatedly blasted U.S. immigration laws as the "worst" in the world and has called on Congress to pass stricter immigration laws.