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Here are the administration officials who have denied they wrote the anonymous NYT op-ed

Here are the administration officials who have denied they wrote the anonymous NYT op-ed
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High-ranking officials in the Trump administration are issuing statements denying they penned an anonymous op-ed bashing the president.

Here's a look at who has denied they are the "senior administration official" behind the op-ed, titled "I Am Part of the Resistance Inside the Trump Administration."

The Hill will be updating this list as statements are offered.

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Vice President Pence

Pence's communications director tweeted early Thursday that the vice president "puts his name on op-eds." Jarrod Agen also defused speculation that a member of Pence's staff was behind the piece, writing "our office is above such amateur acts."

Internet sleuths initially took note of the use of the word "lodestar" in The Times piece, highlighting that Pence had included the term in a number of speeches over the years. The similarity was enough to catch the attention of late-night host Jimmy Kimmel.

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"It's not mine," Pompeo told reporters in India when asked about the op-ed.

The secretary of State went on to excoriate The New York Times over its decision to publish the op-ed, arguing the newspaper was complicit in an effort to "undermine" the administration by publishing the words of a "disgruntled, deceptive, bad actor."

White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders

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In the face of growing speculation over the author, Sanders issued a statement blasting reporters for trying to track down the person's identity.

"The media’s wild obsession with the identity of the anonymous coward is recklessly tarnishing the reputation of thousands of great Americans who proudly serve our country and work for President TrumpDonald TrumpWhite House denies pausing military aid package to Ukraine Poll: 30 percent of GOP voters believe Trump will 'likely' be reinstated this year Black Secret Service agent told Trump it was offensive to hold rally in Tulsa on Juneteenth: report MORE. Stop," Sanders tweeted.

She instead urged those curious about the person's identity to call The New York Times's opinion desk.

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Coats, who has publicly differed from Trump on matters of foreign election interference, called speculation that he or his deputy penned the op-ed "patently false."

“From the beginning of our tenure, we have insisted that the entire [intelligence community] remain focused on our mission to provide the President and policymakers with the best intelligence possible," Coats said in a statement.

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Nielsen issued a statement through a spokesman denying she was behind the op-ed.

"Secretary Nielsen is focused on leading the men & women of DHS and protecting the homeland — not writing anonymous & false opinion pieces for the New York Times," said Tyler Houlton, press secretary for the Department of Homeland Security.

"These types of political attacks are beneath the Secretary & the Department's mission," he added.

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Asked if the Pentagon had any reaction to speculation over the author of the piece, a Pentagon spokesman told The Hill that Mattis "did not write" the op-ed.

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A spokesman for Mnuchin called it "laughable" to think that the secretary authored the op-ed.

"He feels it was irresponsible for @nytimes to print this anonymous piece. Now, dignified public servants are forced to deny being the source," Tony Sayegh Jr. tweeted.

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A Justice Department spokesman told CNN that Sessions did not write the piece.

Sarah Igur Flores, the department's director of public affairs, referred The Hill to Sanders's statement.

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"The Secretary didn’t write the op-ed," a Housing and Urban Development spokesman told The Hill.

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Zinke's office told Politico that neither the secretary nor Deputy Secretary Dave Bernhardt wrote the piece.

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"The Secretary does not play these sophomoric Washington games. He is definitively not the author," a department spokesperson told The Hill.

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Trump accused the author of "sabotaging" the country with their "cowardly actions."

She added that freedom of speech is important to the country, but lamented the frequent use of anonymous sources.

"If a person is bold enough to accuse people of negative actions, they have a responsibility to publicly stand by their words and people have the right to be able to defend themselves," Trump said in a statement to The Hill.

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Perry tweeted a denial, writing that he did not write the op-ed, "nor do I agree with its characterizations."

"Hiding behind anonymity and smearing the President of the United States does not make you an 'unsung hero', it makes you a coward, unworthy of serving this Nation," Perry tweeted.

Acting Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Andrew Wheeler

Environmental Protection Agency spokesman John Konkus referred The Hill to Sanders's statement, and added that Wheeler, who has only been in his current role since July, "supports President Trump 100%."

"He also believes whoever wrote the op-ed should resign," Konkus said.

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"Of course not," Conway told NBC News when asked if she wrote the op-ed.

Conway is among the president's fiercest defenders, making frequent television appearances backing Trump. However, her husband, George Conway, regularly shares opinion pieces and news stories critical of Trump. On Wednesday, he shared the op-ed.

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Ross tweeted that he did not write the op-ed and added that he was "thoroughly appalled" by the piece.

"I couldn’t be prouder of our work at Commerce and of @POTUS," Ross added.

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CIA Director Gina Haspel

When asked if Haspel wrote the op-ed, CIA press secretary Tim Barrett responded "no."

Secretary of Veterans Affairs Robert Wilkie

A VA spokesperson told The Hill that "neither Secretary Wilkie nor anyone else at VA wrote the op-ed."

Press secretary Curt Cashour referred to Sanders's tweet and touted the VA's accomplishments under Trump. 

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An OMB spokesperson told The Hill that Mulvaney "did not write the op-ed."

U.S. Ambassador to Russia Jon Huntsman

"Anything sent out by me would have carried my name," Huntsman said through a spokeswoman on Twitter.

"An early political lesson I learned: never send an anonymous op-ed," he added.

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A department spokesperson said that Perdue did not write the op-ed.

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The Department of Education's press secretary issued a statement denying that she authored the op-ed.

"[DeVos] is not a Washington insider and does not play Washington insider games," the spokesperson said in a tweet. "She has the courage of her convictions and signs her opinions."

Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar
 
"No, Secretary Azar did not write the op-ed," a spokeswoman for the department told The Hill.
 
White House National Security Adviser John Bolton
 
 
A NSA spokesman tweeted that Bolton did not write the op-ed.
 
“As General Sherman said, no," the statement attributed to Bolton read.
 
FBI Director Christopher Wray
 
A spokeswoman for the FBI denied to multiple media outlets that the agency’s director wrote the op-ed.
 
-Updated 8 p.m.