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Here are the administration officials who have denied they wrote the anonymous NYT op-ed

Here are the administration officials who have denied they wrote the anonymous NYT op-ed
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High-ranking officials in the Trump administration are issuing statements denying they penned an anonymous op-ed bashing the president.

Here's a look at who has denied they are the "senior administration official" behind the op-ed, titled "I Am Part of the Resistance Inside the Trump Administration."

The Hill will be updating this list as statements are offered.

Vice President Pence

Pence's communications director tweeted early Thursday that the vice president "puts his name on op-eds." Jarrod Agen also defused speculation that a member of Pence's staff was behind the piece, writing "our office is above such amateur acts."

Internet sleuths initially took note of the use of the word "lodestar" in The Times piece, highlighting that Pence had included the term in a number of speeches over the years. The similarity was enough to catch the attention of late-night host Jimmy Kimmel.

Secretary of State Mike PompeoMichael (Mike) Richard PompeoTrump: NY Times report on North Korean missile bases inaccurate Pompeo accuses Newsweek of 'helping' Iran 'spread lies' Overnight Defense — Presented by Raytheon — Trump's Armistice Day trip marked by controversy | US ends aerial refueling to Saudi coalition in Yemen | Analysts identify undeclared North Korean missile bases MORE

"It's not mine," Pompeo told reporters in India when asked about the op-ed.

The secretary of State went on to excoriate The New York Times over its decision to publish the op-ed, arguing the newspaper was complicit in an effort to "undermine" the administration by publishing the words of a "disgruntled, deceptive, bad actor."

White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders

In the face of growing speculation over the author, Sanders issued a statement blasting reporters for trying to track down the person's identity.

"The media’s wild obsession with the identity of the anonymous coward is recklessly tarnishing the reputation of thousands of great Americans who proudly serve our country and work for President TrumpDonald John TrumpDeath toll in Northern California wildfire rises to 48: authorities Graham backs bill to protect Mueller Denham loses GOP seat in California MORE. Stop," Sanders tweeted.

She instead urged those curious about the person's identity to call The New York Times's opinion desk.

Director of National Intelligence Dan CoatsDaniel (Dan) Ray CoatsHillicon Valley: Official warns midterm influence could trigger sanctions | UK, Canada call on Zuckerberg to testify | Google exec resigns after harassment allegations | Gab CEO defends platform | T-Mobile, Sprint tailor merger pitch for Trump Dem slams intel chief over classified response on Trump's Chinese election meddling claims The Hill's Morning Report — Presented by PhRMA — Trump divides Republicans ahead of midterms MORE

Coats, who has publicly differed from Trump on matters of foreign election interference, called speculation that he or his deputy penned the op-ed "patently false."

“From the beginning of our tenure, we have insisted that the entire [intelligence community] remain focused on our mission to provide the President and policymakers with the best intelligence possible," Coats said in a statement.

Secretary of Homeland Security Kirstjen NielsenKirstjen Michele NielsenBill cementing cybersecurity agency at DHS heads to Trump's desk Overnight Defense — Presented by Raytheon — First lady's office pushes for ouster of national security aide | Trump taps retired general as ambassador to Saudis | Mattis to visit border troops | Record number of female veterans to serve in Congress Hillicon Valley: Trump eyes staff shake-up | Amazon taps NYC, Northern Virginia for new offices | What it will mean for DC | Tech firms buck Trump on cyber pact | Defense official warns against hacking back MORE

Nielsen issued a statement through a spokesman denying she was behind the op-ed.

"Secretary Nielsen is focused on leading the men & women of DHS and protecting the homeland — not writing anonymous & false opinion pieces for the New York Times," said Tyler Houlton, press secretary for the Department of Homeland Security.

"These types of political attacks are beneath the Secretary & the Department's mission," he added.

Defense Secretary James MattisJames Norman MattisOvernight Defense — Presented by Raytheon — First lady's office pushes for ouster of national security aide | Trump taps retired general as ambassador to Saudis | Mattis to visit border troops | Record number of female veterans to serve in Congress Trump eyes post-midterm shakeup First lady's office says Bolton aide 'no longer deserves the honor' of serving White House MORE

Asked if the Pentagon had any reaction to speculation over the author of the piece, a Pentagon spokesman told The Hill that Mattis "did not write" the op-ed.

Treasury Secretary Steven MnuchinSteven Terner MnuchinOn The Money: Amazon taps New York, Northern Virginia for new offices | What it means for the DC area | Dems target vulnerable commerce chief | Earmarks look to be making a comeback New IRS chief to make updating agency technology a priority Trade discussions resume between US, China MORE

A spokesman for Mnuchin called it "laughable" to think that the secretary authored the op-ed.

"He feels it was irresponsible for @nytimes to print this anonymous piece. Now, dignified public servants are forced to deny being the source," Tony Sayegh Jr. tweeted.

Attorney General Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsGraham backs bill to protect Mueller Democrats in murky legal water with Whitaker lawsuits Whitaker’s past business dealings under scrutiny MORE

A Justice Department spokesman told CNN that Sessions did not write the piece.

Sarah Igur Flores, the department's director of public affairs, referred The Hill to Sanders's statement.

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"The Secretary didn’t write the op-ed," a Housing and Urban Development spokesman told The Hill.

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Zinke's office told Politico that neither the secretary nor Deputy Secretary Dave Bernhardt wrote the piece.

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"The Secretary does not play these sophomoric Washington games. He is definitively not the author," a department spokesperson told The Hill.

First lady Melania TrumpMelania TrumpOvernight Defense — Presented by Raytheon — First lady's office pushes for ouster of national security aide | Trump taps retired general as ambassador to Saudis | Mattis to visit border troops | Record number of female veterans to serve in Congress Trumps set to skip Kennedy Center Honors again Trump eyes post-midterm shakeup MORE

Trump accused the author of "sabotaging" the country with their "cowardly actions."

She added that freedom of speech is important to the country, but lamented the frequent use of anonymous sources.

"If a person is bold enough to accuse people of negative actions, they have a responsibility to publicly stand by their words and people have the right to be able to defend themselves," Trump said in a statement to The Hill.

Secretary of Energy Rick PerryJames (Rick) Richard PerryPerry: We shouldn't let Russia use energy as a weapon The Hill's Morning Report — Presented by T-Mobile — Dems prepare to aggressively wield new oversight powers Poland inks deal to buy US natural gas MORE

Perry tweeted a denial, writing that he did not write the op-ed, "nor do I agree with its characterizations."

"Hiding behind anonymity and smearing the President of the United States does not make you an 'unsung hero', it makes you a coward, unworthy of serving this Nation," Perry tweeted.

Acting Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Andrew Wheeler

Environmental Protection Agency spokesman John Konkus referred The Hill to Sanders's statement, and added that Wheeler, who has only been in his current role since July, "supports President Trump 100%."

"He also believes whoever wrote the op-ed should resign," Konkus said.

White House counselor Kellyanne ConwayKellyanne Elizabeth ConwayTrump’s new strategy: Chummer-in-Chief Kellyanne Conway responds to idea of Clinton 2020 campaign House Dems preview plans to flex oversight muscles MORE

"Of course not," Conway told NBC News when asked if she wrote the op-ed.

Conway is among the president's fiercest defenders, making frequent television appearances backing Trump. However, her husband, George Conway, regularly shares opinion pieces and news stories critical of Trump. On Wednesday, he shared the op-ed.

Commerce Secretary Wilbur RossWilbur Louis RossOn The Money: Amazon taps New York, Northern Virginia for new offices | What it means for the DC area | Dems target vulnerable commerce chief | Earmarks look to be making a comeback Trump eyes post-midterm shakeup The Hill's Morning Report — Presented by T-Mobile — Congress returns to leadership races, lame-duck drama MORE

Ross tweeted that he did not write the op-ed and added that he was "thoroughly appalled" by the piece.

"I couldn’t be prouder of our work at Commerce and of @POTUS," Ross added.

CIA Director Gina Haspel

When asked if Haspel wrote the op-ed, CIA press secretary Tim Barrett responded "no."

Secretary of Veterans Affairs Robert Wilkie

A VA spokesperson told The Hill that "neither Secretary Wilkie nor anyone else at VA wrote the op-ed."

Press secretary Curt Cashour referred to Sanders's tweet and touted the VA's accomplishments under Trump. 

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An OMB spokesperson told The Hill that Mulvaney "did not write the op-ed."

U.S. Ambassador to Russia Jon Huntsman

"Anything sent out by me would have carried my name," Huntsman said through a spokeswoman on Twitter.

"An early political lesson I learned: never send an anonymous op-ed," he added.

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A department spokesperson said that Perdue did not write the op-ed.

Education Secretary Betsy DeVosElizabeth (Betsy) Dee DeVosDeVos sued for allegedly failing to comply with judge’s order to cancel student debt The Hill's Morning Report — Presented by T-Mobile — Congress returns to leadership races, lame-duck drama Report: DeVos has no plans to step down MORE

The Department of Education's press secretary issued a statement denying that she authored the op-ed.

"[DeVos] is not a Washington insider and does not play Washington insider games," the spokesperson said in a tweet. "She has the courage of her convictions and signs her opinions."

Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar
 
"No, Secretary Azar did not write the op-ed," a spokeswoman for the department told The Hill.
 
White House National Security Adviser John Bolton
 
 
A NSA spokesman tweeted that Bolton did not write the op-ed.
 
“As General Sherman said, no," the statement attributed to Bolton read.
 
FBI Director Christopher Wray
 
A spokeswoman for the FBI denied to multiple media outlets that the agency’s director wrote the op-ed.
 
-Updated 8 p.m.