Trump: Races that GOP was not thinking about winning 'are now very close'

Trump: Races that GOP was not thinking about winning 'are now very close'
© ABC News

President TrumpDonald John TrumpSunday shows preview: Trump sells U.N. reorganizing and Kavanaugh allegations dominate Ex-Trump staffer out at CNN amid “false and defamatory accusations” Democrats opposed to Pelosi lack challenger to topple her MORE touted Republicans' strength heading into the midterm elections late Saturday night in a series of tweets hinting that November's elections could lead to "interesting" results.

It was unclear to which races Trump was specifically referring in the tweets, but the president claimed that several contests the GOP "were not even thinking about winning" were now "very close."

"Republicans are doing really well with the Senate Midterms. Races that we were not even thinking about winning are now very close, or even leading," he wrote.

ADVERTISEMENT

"Election night will be very interesting indeed!"

In a second tweet, the president mocked Democrats for harsh rhetoric lobbed against him in recent months.

"The Dems have tried every trick in the playbook-call me everything under the sun. But if I’m all of those terrible things, how come I beat them so badly, 306-223?" Trump tweeted, incorrectly referencing his actual electoral college vote score of 304-227.

"Maybe they’re just not very good!" he added. "The fact is they are going CRAZY only because they know they can’t beat me in 2020!"

His remarks come hours after White House budget chief Mick MulvaneyJohn (Mick) Michael MulvaneyProtect the Military Lending Act On The Money: Midterms to shake up House finance panel | Chamber chief says US not in trade war | Mulvaney moving CFPB unit out of DC | Conservatives frustrated over big spending bills Warren suggests Mulvaney broke law by speaking to GOP donors MORE told a closed-door meeting of Republicans that the party stands to "possibly" pick up a Senate seat from Sen. Bill NelsonClarence (Bill) William NelsonNelson campaign to donate K from Al Franken group to charity Political shenanigans mask true problems in Puerto Rico The Hill's Morning Report — Sponsored by United Against Nuclear Iran — The Hill interviews President Trump MORE (D) of Florida, while Texas Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzViral video shows O’Rourke air-drumming to the Who’s ‘Baba O’Riley’ after Cruz debate Five takeaways from Cruz, O'Rourke's fiery first debate NY Times, McCabe give Trump perfect cover to fire Rosenstein, Sessions MORE (R) also faces the possibility of losing his seat.

“There’s a very real possibility we will win a race for Senate in Florida and lose a race in Texas for Senate, OK?” Mulvaney said, according to audio obtained by The New York Times.

“I don’t think it’s likely, but it’s a possibility. How likable is a candidate? That still counts.”

Democrats are hoping to make up a gap of two seats in the Senate, but face an unfavorable midterm map in the upper chamber as several vulnerable Democrats are up for reelection.

The party also hopes to make up a gap of 23 seats to regain control of the House, where Democrats currently have a single-digit lead over the GOP, according to recent polling data.