Trump: FBI doesn't want to investigate Kavanaugh

Trump: FBI doesn't want to investigate Kavanaugh

President TrumpDonald John TrumpPentagon update to missile defense doctrine will explore space-base technologies, lasers to counter threats Giuliani: 'I never said there was no collusion' between the Trump campaign and Russia Former congressmen, RNC members appointed to Trump administration roles MORE said Tuesday the FBI doesn’t want to investigate sexual assault allegations against Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh. 

"I don’t think the FBI really should be involved because they don’t want to be involved," Trump told reporters in the Oval Office during a meeting with Poland's president.

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Trump said he hasn't spoken to his pick for the Supreme Court since Sunday, when The Washington Post published Christine Blasey Ford's allegations that Kavanaugh sexually assaulted her during a high school party in the 1980s.

Trump indicated that he has made a point not to speak with Kavanaugh because he expected to be asked about any conversations with the judge.

"He can handle himself better than anybody," Trump said. "I’m totally supportive. I would say few people that I’ve ever seen, that I’ve ever known … have been so outstanding as Judge Kavanaugh."

Kavanaugh and Ford are expected to testify in a public hearing next Monday about the allegations, though Judiciary Committee Chairman Sen. Chuck GrassleyCharles (Chuck) Ernest GrassleyOvernight Health Care: Dem chair plans hearing on Medicare for all | Senate GOP talks drug prices with Trump health chief | PhRMA CEO hopeful Trump reverses course on controversial pricing proposal IRS waiving penalty for some in first filing season under Trump's tax law HHS secretary, Senate Finance Republicans talk drug pricing MORE (R-Iowa) said Ford's attorney still has not confirmed that the accuser will appear.

Trump on Tuesday echoed complaints from some Republicans over the timing of the allegations, questioning why Democrats did not disclose them sooner.

Sen. Dianne FeinsteinDianne Emiel FeinsteinFeinstein grappling with vote on AG nominee Barr 5 takeaways from Barr’s testimony Grandson's note to Barr during confirmation hearing goes viral MORE (Calif.), the ranking Democrat on the Judiciary Committee, was made aware of Ford's claims in July but did not act on them or bring them up during hearings because the accuser asked they remain private.

Trump said the process will be delayed until it can completed, adding that "we want to get to the bottom of everything."

The White House has stood by Kavanaugh even as his nomination has been thrown into turmoil by Ford's allegations.

Ford claims that Kavanaugh pinned her down and attempted to remove her clothes during a party in the early 1980s, and then put his hand over her mouth when she tried to scream for help.

Kavanaugh has denied the allegations and said he is willing to testify before the Senate Judiciary Committee to "defend my integrity."

Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerCardi B expresses solidarity with federal workers not getting paid Government shutdown impasse is a leveraging crisis Overnight Health Care: Dem chair meets Trump health chief on drug prices | Trump officials sued over new Kentucky Medicaid work rules | Democrats vow to lift ban on federal funds for abortions MORE (D-N.Y.) late Monday  called for the FBI to conduct a thorough review of the allegations. He clarified that he is not asking for a criminal investigation, but for the bureau to re-open its background check of Kavanaugh.
 
The Justice Department said shortly before Schumer's statement that the allegation against the judge "does not involve any potential federal crime" and that the FBI's role in conducting background checks is to assess potential threats to national security, according to The Associated Press.