Trump to meet with Rosenstein on Thursday

President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump's newest Russia adviser, Andrew Peek, leaves post: report Hawley expects McConnell's final impeachment resolution to give White House defense ability to motion to dismiss Trump rips New York City sea wall: 'Costly, foolish' and 'environmentally unfriendly idea' MORE will meet with Rod RosensteinRod RosensteinRosenstein says he authorized release of Strzok-Page texts Journalist alleging Obama administration spied on her seeks to reopen case Rosenstein on his time in Trump administration: 'We got all the big issues right' MORE on Thursday, the White House said Monday, leaving the deputy attorney general's future in limbo amid reports of his possible ouster.

The White House issued the statement after hours of confusion about Rosenstein's job status triggered by a visit to the executive mansion, where the No. 2 Justice Department official reportedly expected to be fired or would resign.

"At the request of Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, he and President Trump had an extended conversation to discuss the recent news stories," White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said Monday in a statement.

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"Because the President is at the United Nations General Assembly and has a full schedule with leaders from around the world, they will meet on Thursday when the President returns to Washington, D.C.," she added.

As of early afternoon, Rosenstein remained in his position, but it is unclear if he will survive Thursday's high-stakes meeting with the president.

There has been broad speculation about the future of Rosenstein's job after The New York Times reported on Friday that the deputy attorney general suggested secretly taping the president last year and recruiting Cabinet officials to invoke the 25th Amendment to remove Trump from office for being unfit.

Rosenstein has aggressively denied the report as inaccurate. 

In an interview with Geraldo Rivera that aired early Monday, Trump said he did not have "all the facts" about the reports, but said he would make a "determination" about the deputy attorney general's future. 

“I don’t want to comment on it until I’ve got all the facts. I haven’t gotten all the facts," Trump said. "We will make a determination."  

Rosenstein's removal would likely create havoc in Washington, potentially roiling the special counsel's Russia investigation, which Rosenstein currently oversees as a result of Attorney General Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsICE subpoenas Denver law enforcement: report Bottom Line DOJ inquiry tied to Clinton, touted by Trump winds down with no tangible results: report MORE's recusal.

Rosenstein appointed Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerSchiff: Trump acquittal in Senate trial would not signal a 'failure' Jeffries blasts Trump for attack on Thunberg at impeachment hearing Live coverage: House Judiciary to vote on impeachment after surprise delay MORE last May to spearhead the probe into possible collusion between the Trump campaign and Moscow, after Trump abruptly fired former FBI Director James ComeyJames Brien ComeyNYT: Justice investigating alleged Comey leak of years-old classified info Bernie-Hillary echoes seen in Biden-Sanders primary fight Rosenstein on his time in Trump administration: 'We got all the big issues right' MORE

Trump has consistently criticized both Sessions and Rosenstein over the probe, which he views as a political "witch hunt" against him. 

Updated at 1:33 p.m.