Trump to meet with Rosenstein on Thursday

President TrumpDonald John TrumpOmar fires back at Trump over rally remarks: 'This is my country' Pelosi: Trump hurrying to fill SCOTUS seat so he can repeal ObamaCare Trump mocks Biden appearance, mask use ahead of first debate MORE will meet with Rod RosensteinRod RosensteinDOJ kept investigators from completing probe of Trump ties to Russia: report Five takeaways from final Senate Intel Russia report FBI officials hid copies of Russia probe documents fearing Trump interference: book MORE on Thursday, the White House said Monday, leaving the deputy attorney general's future in limbo amid reports of his possible ouster.

The White House issued the statement after hours of confusion about Rosenstein's job status triggered by a visit to the executive mansion, where the No. 2 Justice Department official reportedly expected to be fired or would resign.

"At the request of Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, he and President Trump had an extended conversation to discuss the recent news stories," White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said Monday in a statement.

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"Because the President is at the United Nations General Assembly and has a full schedule with leaders from around the world, they will meet on Thursday when the President returns to Washington, D.C.," she added.

As of early afternoon, Rosenstein remained in his position, but it is unclear if he will survive Thursday's high-stakes meeting with the president.

There has been broad speculation about the future of Rosenstein's job after The New York Times reported on Friday that the deputy attorney general suggested secretly taping the president last year and recruiting Cabinet officials to invoke the 25th Amendment to remove Trump from office for being unfit.

Rosenstein has aggressively denied the report as inaccurate. 

In an interview with Geraldo Rivera that aired early Monday, Trump said he did not have "all the facts" about the reports, but said he would make a "determination" about the deputy attorney general's future. 

“I don’t want to comment on it until I’ve got all the facts. I haven’t gotten all the facts," Trump said. "We will make a determination."  

Rosenstein's removal would likely create havoc in Washington, potentially roiling the special counsel's Russia investigation, which Rosenstein currently oversees as a result of Attorney General Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsGOP set to release controversial Biden report Trump's policies on refugees are as simple as ABCs Ocasio-Cortez, Velázquez call for convention to decide Puerto Rico status MORE's recusal.

Rosenstein appointed Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) MuellerCNN's Toobin warns McCabe is in 'perilous condition' with emboldened Trump CNN anchor rips Trump over Stone while evoking Clinton-Lynch tarmac meeting The Hill's 12:30 Report: New Hampshire fallout MORE last May to spearhead the probe into possible collusion between the Trump campaign and Moscow, after Trump abruptly fired former FBI Director James ComeyJames Brien ComeyDemocrats fear Russia interference could spoil bid to retake Senate Book: FBI sex crimes investigator helped trigger October 2016 public probe of Clinton emails Trump jabs at FBI director over testimony on Russia, antifa MORE

Trump has consistently criticized both Sessions and Rosenstein over the probe, which he views as a political "witch hunt" against him. 

Updated at 1:33 p.m.