Holder: Supreme Court's legitimacy can be questioned after Kavanaugh confirmation

Holder: Supreme Court's legitimacy can be questioned after Kavanaugh confirmation
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Former Attorney General Eric HolderEric Himpton HolderFormer Bush assistant: Mueller report makes Obama look 'just plain bad' Holder: Any 'competent' prosecutor could win obstruction case against Trump Meghan McCain to Sunny Hostin on Assange defense: 'Straight propaganda!' MORE said over the weekend that the Supreme Court's legitimacy can be "justifiably" questioned, citing Brett Kavanaugh's confirmation as a justice. 

"With the confirmation of Kavanaugh and the process which led to it, (and the treatment of Merrick GarlandMerrick Brian GarlandThe Hill's Morning Report — Category 5 Mueller storm to hit today McConnell touts Trump support, Supreme Court fights in reelection video Hatch warns 'dangerous' idea of court packing could hurt religious liberty MORE), the legitimacy of the Supreme Court can justifiably be questioned," Holder tweeted on Saturday, referencing former President Obama's final Supreme Court nominee, who was blocked by Republican senators. 

"The Court must now prove - through its work - that it is worthy of the nation’s trust," Holder added. 

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The strong criticism from Holder, who served in Obama's administration from 2009 to 2015, came only moments after the Senate confirmed Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court in a 50-48 vote. 

The vote concluded what was a contentious confirmation process in which Kavanaugh faced multiple allegations of sexual misconduct. 

Kavanaugh and Christine Blasey Ford testified before the Senate Judiciary Committee last month regarding Ford's claims that he sexually assaulted her at a high school party in the 1980s. 

Kavanaugh has fiercely denied the accusation. He's also pushed back against sexual misconduct claims from two other women, Julie Swetnick and Deborah Ramirez. 

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellSenate Republicans tested on Trump support after Mueller Anti-smoking advocates question industry motives for backing higher purchasing age Former Bush assistant: Mueller report makes Obama look 'just plain bad' MORE (R-Ky.) hailed the Senate's vote to confirm Kavanaugh on Saturday, saying that it sent a clear message. 

"This is an institution where the evidence and the facts matter. ... This is a chamber in which the politics of intimidation and personal destruction do not win the day," he said. 

On the other hand, many Democrats have decried the outcome.

Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisCory Booker has a problem in 2020: Kamala Harris Booker to supporter who wanted him to punch Trump: 'Black guys like us, we don't get away with that' Tulsi Gabbard fundraises off 4/20: 'Appalls me' that feds consider marijuana illegal MORE (D-Calif.), for example, said on Sunday that Kavanaugh's confirmation was a "denial of justice for the women of this country and sexual assault survivors, men and women."