Holder: Supreme Court's legitimacy can be questioned after Kavanaugh confirmation

Holder: Supreme Court's legitimacy can be questioned after Kavanaugh confirmation
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Former Attorney General Eric HolderEric Himpton HolderThe most important pledge Democratic presidential candidates can make Congress and contempt: What you need to know The Hill's Morning Report - Democrats wonder: Can Nadler handle the Trump probe? MORE said over the weekend that the Supreme Court's legitimacy can be "justifiably" questioned, citing Brett Kavanaugh's confirmation as a justice. 

"With the confirmation of Kavanaugh and the process which led to it, (and the treatment of Merrick GarlandMerrick Brian GarlandEXCLUSIVE — Trump: I would fill Supreme Court vacancy before 2020 election Bernie Sanders hits McConnell for saying DC, Puerto Rico statehood is 'full-bore socialism' Democrats should initiate a 'Fire Mitch McConnell' campaign MORE), the legitimacy of the Supreme Court can justifiably be questioned," Holder tweeted on Saturday, referencing former President Obama's final Supreme Court nominee, who was blocked by Republican senators. 

"The Court must now prove - through its work - that it is worthy of the nation’s trust," Holder added. 

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The strong criticism from Holder, who served in Obama's administration from 2009 to 2015, came only moments after the Senate confirmed Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court in a 50-48 vote. 

The vote concluded what was a contentious confirmation process in which Kavanaugh faced multiple allegations of sexual misconduct. 

Kavanaugh and Christine Blasey Ford testified before the Senate Judiciary Committee last month regarding Ford's claims that he sexually assaulted her at a high school party in the 1980s. 

Kavanaugh has fiercely denied the accusation. He's also pushed back against sexual misconduct claims from two other women, Julie Swetnick and Deborah Ramirez. 

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellEXCLUSIVE: Trump on reparations: 'I don't see it happening' Overnight Health Care — Sponsored by Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids — Trump issues order to bring transparency to health care prices | Fight over billions in ObamaCare payments heads to Supreme Court Hillicon Valley: Senate bill would force companies to disclose value of user data | Waters to hold hearing on Facebook cryptocurrency | GOP divided on election security bills | US tracking Russian, Iranian social media campaigns MORE (R-Ky.) hailed the Senate's vote to confirm Kavanaugh on Saturday, saying that it sent a clear message. 

"This is an institution where the evidence and the facts matter. ... This is a chamber in which the politics of intimidation and personal destruction do not win the day," he said. 

On the other hand, many Democrats have decried the outcome.

Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisThe Hill's Morning Report - In exclusive interview, Trump talks Biden, Iran, SCOTUS and reparations Biden to debate for first time as front-runner Rules for first Democratic primary debates announced MORE (D-Calif.), for example, said on Sunday that Kavanaugh's confirmation was a "denial of justice for the women of this country and sexual assault survivors, men and women."