Holder: Supreme Court's legitimacy can be questioned after Kavanaugh confirmation

Holder: Supreme Court's legitimacy can be questioned after Kavanaugh confirmation
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Former Attorney General Eric HolderEric Himpton HolderOcasio-Cortez to be first guest on new Desus and Mero show Holder says he will make 2020 decision in coming weeks Holder: If Trump directed Cohen to lie, impeachment proceedings ‘must begin’ MORE said over the weekend that the Supreme Court's legitimacy can be "justifiably" questioned, citing Brett Kavanaugh's confirmation as a justice. 

"With the confirmation of Kavanaugh and the process which led to it, (and the treatment of Merrick GarlandMerrick Brian GarlandGOP advances rules change to speed up confirmation of Trump nominees New battle lines in war over Trump’s judicial picks Mitch McConnell has shown the nation his version of power grab MORE), the legitimacy of the Supreme Court can justifiably be questioned," Holder tweeted on Saturday, referencing former President Obama's final Supreme Court nominee, who was blocked by Republican senators. 

"The Court must now prove - through its work - that it is worthy of the nation’s trust," Holder added. 

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The strong criticism from Holder, who served in Obama's administration from 2009 to 2015, came only moments after the Senate confirmed Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court in a 50-48 vote. 

The vote concluded what was a contentious confirmation process in which Kavanaugh faced multiple allegations of sexual misconduct. 

Kavanaugh and Christine Blasey Ford testified before the Senate Judiciary Committee last month regarding Ford's claims that he sexually assaulted her at a high school party in the 1980s. 

Kavanaugh has fiercely denied the accusation. He's also pushed back against sexual misconduct claims from two other women, Julie Swetnick and Deborah Ramirez. 

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellBill Kristol resurfaces video of Pence calling Obama executive action on immigration a 'profound mistake' Winners and losers in the border security deal House passes border deal, setting up Trump to declare emergency MORE (R-Ky.) hailed the Senate's vote to confirm Kavanaugh on Saturday, saying that it sent a clear message. 

"This is an institution where the evidence and the facts matter. ... This is a chamber in which the politics of intimidation and personal destruction do not win the day," he said. 

On the other hand, many Democrats have decried the outcome.

Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisHillicon Valley: New York says goodbye to Amazon's HQ2 | AOC reacts: 'Anything is possible' | FTC pushes for record Facebook fine | Cyber threats to utilities on the rise O’Rourke heading to Wisconsin amid 2020 speculation 2020 Dems slam Trump's plan to declare national emergency MORE (D-Calif.), for example, said on Sunday that Kavanaugh's confirmation was a "denial of justice for the women of this country and sexual assault survivors, men and women."