Trump calls Kavanaugh allegations a 'hoax that was set up by the Democrats'

President TrumpDonald John TrumpButtigieg on Mueller report: 'Politically, I'm not sure it will change much' Sarah Sanders addresses false statements detailed in Mueller report: 'A slip of the tongue' Trump to visit Japan in May to meet with Abe, new emperor MORE said Monday that he expects a lot of Democratic voters to support Republican candidates in the upcoming midterms because of how the party's lawmakers handled sexual misconduct allegations against Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh.

"The main base of the Democrats have shifted so far left that we’ll end up being Venezuela. This country would end up being Venezuela. I think a lot of Democrats are going to be voting Republican on Nov. 6," Trump told reporters at the White House before departing for a law enforcement event in Florida.

The president seized on the specter raised by some liberals of impeaching Kavanaugh, who was confirmed to the Supreme Court on Saturday after being accused by three women of sexual misconduct and facing questions from Democrats about his judicial temperament.

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Trump dismissed the allegations against Kavanaugh — including that he sexually assaulted Christine Blasey Ford when the two were in high school — as "a hoax that was set up by the Democrats."

He later blasted allegations from Julie Swetnick that Kavanaugh was present at parties where high school boys got girls drunk so they could be "gang raped," calling them "made up," "fabricated" and "a disgrace."

"And now they want to impeach him," Trump said. "I think it’s an insult to the American public. I think you’re going to see a lot of things happen on Nov. 6 that would not have happened before."

Rep. Jerrold Nadler (D-N.Y.), the ranking Democrat on the House Judiciary Committee, said last week on the eve of Kavanaugh's confirmation that Democrats would investigate the sexual misconduct allegations against the judge if the party reclaimed the majority in the House.

Nadler did not comment on the possibility of impeaching Kavanaugh, and other Democratic lawmakers have refrained from discussing that prospect, or indicated they have no intention to pursue it in the near future.

Sen. Christopher CoonsChristopher (Chris) Andrew CoonsMenendez, Rubio lead Senate effort to regulate Venezuelan sanctions Dem report questions State Dept. decision to revoke award to Trump critic Senate Dem calls on Trump to apologize for attacks on McCain MORE (D-Del.), a member of the Senate Judiciary Committee, called impeachment discussions "premature," while House Minority Leader Nancy PelosiNancy Patricia D'Alesandro PelosiDems plan Monday call on Mueller report: 'Congress will not be silent' Heavily redacted Mueller report leaves major questions unanswered Top Dems: Barr 'deliberately distorted' portions of Mueller report MORE (D-Calif.) said it "would not be my plan" to impeach the justice.

The Senate confirmed Kavanaugh on Saturday afternoon in a 50-48 vote, with one GOP senator absent and another voting "present." Every Democrat opposed Kavanaugh's nomination except for Sen. Joe ManchinJoseph (Joe) ManchinOn The Money: Cain 'very committed' to Fed bid despite opposition | Pelosi warns no US-UK trade deal if Brexit harms Irish peace | Ivanka Trump says she turned down World Bank job Cain says he won't back down, wants to be nominated to Fed Pro-life Christians are demanding pollution protections MORE (D-W.Va.).

Hundreds of anti-Kavanaugh protesters descended on the Capitol in the days leading up to the confirmation vote, with some activists confronting lawmakers and urging them to oppose the justice’s nomination.

Democrats have expressed optimism that the furor over Kavanaugh’s confirmation will translate to high turnout in November.

In the aftermath of the vote, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellOvernight Health Care: McConnell offering bill to raise tobacco-buying age to 21 | NC gov vetoes 'born alive' abortion bill | CMS backs off controversial abortion proposal HR 1 brings successful local, state reforms to the federal level and deserves passage The Hill's 12:30 Report: Inside the Mueller report MORE (R-Ky.) suggested the outpouring of opposition to Kavanaugh would serve to rally GOP voters heading into the final month of the midterm campaign.