Menendez: Concerned about 'leadership vacuum' following Haley departure

Menendez: Concerned about 'leadership vacuum' following Haley departure
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Sen. Bob MenendezRobert (Bob) MenendezMore oversight of America’s international media networks a good idea Pro-Israel organizations should finally seek payback against Iran deal Dems Trump lowers refugee goal to 30,000, he must meet it MORE (D-N.J.), the ranking Democrat on the Foreign Relations Committee, on Tuesday is raising concerns about what he called the "leadership vacuum" that will be left behind following Nikki HaleyNimrata (Nikki) HaleyThe Hill's Morning Report — Trump shakes up staff with eye on 2020, Mueller probe John Kelly to leave White House at year's end Heather Nauert is the wrong choice for UN ambassador MORE's resignation as U.S. ambassador to the United Nations. 

"Today’s announcement that Ambassador Haley is resigning is yet another sign of the Trump Administration’s chaotic foreign policy," Menendez, a vocal critic of the Trump administration, said in a statement on Tuesday. 

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"I am deeply concerned about the leadership vacuum she leaves and the national security impact of her departure at this time of continued disarray for this Administration," he added.

President TrumpDonald John TrumpThe Memo: Ayers decision casts harsh light on Trump NASA offers to show Stephen Curry evidence from moon landings Freedom Caucus calls on leadership to include wall funding, end to 'catch and release' in funding bill MORE announced earlier Tuesday that Haley would leave at the end of the year, emphasizing that her departure was on good terms.

She did not say what she is planning to do next but sought to quash rumors about a possible 2020 run, saying she will campaign for Trump.

 

Haley's departure was lamented by a number of Washington officials.

Speaker Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanOvernight Defense: Dunford expected to finish Joint Chiefs term | House lawmakers pushing for Yemen vote | Pentagon says a few hundred troops leaving border Ocasio-Cortez: Paul Ryan got called a 'genius' when he was elected at 28, I get accused of being 'a fraud' Meadows looks to make his move MORE (R-Wis.) said after Haley's announcement that he was "saddened" to hear of her exit but added that he has been "grateful for her service."

“I want to thank Ambassador Haley for her willingness to express moral clarity to the world and to President Trump, and promote American values and leadership on the global stage, even when she lacked the backing of the White House or State Department," Menendez wrote in the statement.

Sen. Jeanne ShaheenCynthia (Jeanne) Jeanne ShaheenOvernight Defense: Nauert tapped for UN envoy | Trump teases changes to Joint Chiefs of Staff | Trump knocks Tillerson as 'dumb as a rock' | Scathing report details Air Force failures before Texas shooting New Hampshire's secretary of state narrowly holds seat Overnight Health Care: Senators urge vote on delaying health insurance tax | Joe Kennedy III 'hopeful' he can back 'Medicare for all' bill | Latest Ebola outbreak becomes world's 2nd-worst MORE (D-N.H.), who is also on the Foreign Relations Committee, said in a statement to The Hill that she hopes the next nominee will be "experienced" and will understand "the significance of the United Nations as an institution."

“I thank Ambassador Haley for her service and wish her well in her future endeavors,” Shaheen said. “As President Trump considers his next nominee for this position, it’s imperative that he names someone who is experienced and understands the significance of the United Nations as an institution, as well as its mission to promote and maintain peace and security around the world."

Haley in a September op-ed for The Washington Post criticized the author of an anonymous New York Times op-ed by a senior administration official claiming to be part of the "resistance" from inside of the Trump administration. 

"I, too, am a senior Trump administration official," she wrote. "I proudly serve in this administration, and I enthusiastically support most of its decisions and the direction it is taking the country."

"But I don’t agree with the president on everything," Haley added. "When there is disagreement, there is a right way and a wrong way to address it. I pick up the phone and call him or meet with him in person."

--Updated at 1:43 p.m.