Mueller to present key findings related to Russia probe after midterms: report

Special counsel Robert MuellerRobert Swan MuellerSasse: US should applaud choice of Mueller to lead Russia probe MORE is reportedly expected to present findings related to key aspects of his investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election after this November's midterm elections. 

Bloomberg News, citing a pair of unidentified U.S. officials, reported on Wednesday that Mueller is close to finalizing his inquiry into a pair of the most important aspects of his investigation. 

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One of the officials told the news outlet that the findings are related to whether President TrumpDonald John TrumpDem lawmaker says Electoral College was 'conceived' as way to perpetuate slavery Stanley Cup champion Washington Capitals to visit White House on Monday Transportation Dept requests formal audit of Boeing 737 Max certification MORE's 2016 campaign colluded with Russia and if Trump obstructed justice during the probe. 

The officials did not provide details on what those findings may include. 

Bloomberg notes, however, that Mueller's findings on these questions may not be made public, adding that he can only present the findings to the Justice Department official overseeing his investigation, Deputy Attorney General Rod RosensteinRod Jay RosensteinThe Hill's 12:30 Report: Trump steps up attacks on McCain Rosenstein still working at DOJ despite plans to leave in mid-March Graham says he'll probe Rosenstein's 25th Amendment remarks MORE

Rosenstein does have some discretion regarding what findings are issued to Congress and what revelations can be publicly released. 

The news comes about three weeks away from what could be pivotal midterm elections, as Democrats hope to seize on opposition to Trump to retake the House and possibly the Senate. 

Rosenstein has reportedly made it clear to Mueller that he wants the investigation to end as soon as possible. 

Trump has repeatedly railed against the probe, referring to it mainly as a partisan "witch hunt." Questions have arisen regarding whether Trump would go so far as to shut down the investigation. 

But he said in an interview on Sunday that he has "no intention" of taking that step. 

“Well, I don’t pledge anything,” Trump told "60 Minutes." “But I will tell you, I have no intention of doing that. I think it’s a very unfair investigation, because there was no collusion of any kind.”