Trump: A ‘big part’ of anger in society comes from ‘purposely false and inaccurate’ reporting

Trump: A ‘big part’ of anger in society comes from ‘purposely false and inaccurate’ reporting
© Stefani Reynolds

President TrumpDonald TrumpRealClearPolitics reporter says Freedom Caucus shows how much GOP changed under Trump Jake Ellzey defeats Trump-backed candidate in Texas House runoff DOJ declines to back Mo Brooks's defense against Swalwell's Capitol riot lawsuit MORE said one day after explosive devices were sent to prominent Democrats and CNN that "a big part" of the anger in society today is caused by "purposely false and inaccurate reporting" from mainstream media.

He said in an early morning tweet on Thursday that "fake news" has gotten "so bad and hateful that it is beyond description."

"Mainstream Media must clean up its act, FAST!" he wrote.

Trump's also said at a campaign rally late Wednesday that the news media should set a "civil" tone. 

CNN anchor John Berman responded to Trump after reading his tweet on "New Day."

"Let me tell you what the mainstream media has been doing this morning: We've been reporting on a bomb ... sent to either kill, threaten, or scare," he said.

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The network, a frequent target of Trump's rhetoric, reported early Thursday that another device was sent to the office of Robert De Niro, a frequent Trump critic, in New York.

The package sent to CNN on Wednesday included the name of CIA Director John BrennanJohn Owen BrennanUFOs are an intriguing science problem; Congress must act accordingly How transparency on UFOs can unite a deeply divided nation The world's most passionate UFO skeptic versus the government MORE, who is an MSNBC contributor.

Packages were intercepted before reaching the residences of former President Barack ObamaBarack Hussein ObamaObama to join NBA Africa as strategic partner Obama setting up big bash to celebrate his 60th A path to climate, economic and environmental justice is finally on the horizon MORE and Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonBiden says Russia spreading misinformation ahead of 2022 elections Highest-ranking GOP assemblyman in WI against another audit of 2020 vote Women's March endorses Nina Turner in first-ever electoral endorsement MORE.

Rep. Maxine WatersMaxine Moore WatersBipartisan bill will help level the playing field for small businesses Republicans hammer HUD chief over sluggish rental aid Key GOP lawmaker backs Powell for another term as Fed chief MORE (D-Calif.) and former Attorney General Eric HolderEric Himpton HolderBiden under pressure to pick new breed of federal prosecutors Obama says Senate will vote again on voting rights Obama: Voting rights bill must pass before next election MORE were also targeted, although Holder's was sent back to the listed return address, the office of Rep. Debbie Wasserman SchultzDeborah (Debbie) Wasserman SchultzBiden: Families of victims of Surfside building collapse 'realistic' about rescue Biden intends to pick up costs to county, state in Florida building recovery efforts At least 99 people unaccounted for after deadly Miami-area building collapse MORE (D-Fla.).

During an event to sign an anti-opioid bill into law on Wednesday, Trump condemned "political violence" and urged unity.

But Senate Democratic Leader Charles SchumerChuck Schumer84 mayors call for immigration to be included in reconciliation Senate infrastructure talks on shaky grounds Could Andrew Cuomo — despite scandals — be re-elected because of Trump? MORE (N.Y.) and House Democratic Leader Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiHouse to resume mask mandate after new CDC guidance McCarthy pulls GOP picks off House economic panel GOP up in arms over Cheney, Kinzinger MORE (Calif.) called out Trump in a statement later Wednesday.

"Time and time again, the President has condoned physical violence and divided Americans with his words and his actions," the wrote.

"President Trump's words ring hollow until he reverses his statements that condone acts of violence."