Trump says Cabinet changes likely after midterms

President TrumpDonald John TrumpRussia's election interference is a problem for the GOP Pence to pitch trade deal during trip to Michigan: report Iran oil minister: US made 'bad mistake' in ending sanctions waivers MORE said Monday he expects to shake up his Cabinet after Tuesday's midterm elections, though he downplayed reports of frequent clashes with top officials.

"Administrations make changes usually after midterms and probably we'll be right in that category. I think it's very customary," Trump told reporters as he departed for a campaign rally in Ohio.

"For the most part, I love my Cabinet," he continued. "We have some really talented people. Look at the deals we're making on trade. Look at the job we've done on so many different things, including foreign affairs. I mean, we've done record-setting work. I don't know that we get the credit for it, but that's OK."

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Trump reiterated that he intends to announce his pick for ambassador to the United Nations by the end of the week. He said last week that State Department spokeswoman Heather Nauert is under "very serious consideration" to replace current Ambassador Nikki HaleyNimrata (Nikki) HaleyPollster says Trump unlikely to face 'significant' primary challenge Trump blocked renomination of Obama-era UN racism official, won't pick a replacement: report Trump says he considered nominating Ivanka to lead World Bank MORE, who is set to depart by year's end.

Trump also indicated he would "take a look" at the allegations that Interior Secretary Ryan ZinkeRyan Keith ZinkeOvernight Energy: Trump moves to crack down on Iranian oil exports | Florida lawmakers offer bill to ban drilling off state's coast | Bloomberg donates .5M to Paris deal Florida lawmakers offer bill to ban drilling off state's coast Overnight Energy: Gillibrand offers bill to ban pesticide from school lunches | Interior secretary met tribal lawyer tied to Zinke casino dispute | Critics say EPA rule could reintroduce asbestos use MORE violated ethics rules, but added he has not yet seen the claims, which have been referred to the Justice Department.

The president said there's no timeline for replacing the head of the Justice Department, despite widespread reports he intends to move on from Attorney General Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsTrump poised to roll back transgender health protections Trump claims Mueller didn't speak to those 'closest' to him And the winner of the Robert Mueller Sweepstakes is — Vladimir Putin MORE once the midterms have passed. Trump has repeatedly chastised Sessions over his decision to recuse himself from overseeing the investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election.

He also expressed surprise when asked whether he would oust Defense Secretary James MattisJames Norman MattisNew 2020 candidate Moulton on hypothetical Mars invasion: 'I would not build a wall' Trump learns to love acting officials Shanahan says he's 'never favored' Boeing as acting Defense chief MORE, who has pushed back against rumors of his imminent departure. Trump last month said he was unsure if Mattis would stay on, calling him "sort of a Democrat."

Trump's Cabinet has already experienced significant turnover.

Former Secretary of State Rex TillersonRex Wayne TillersonJuan Williams: The high price of working for Trump Graham jokes to Pompeo: You're the 'longest-serving member of the cabinet, right?' Trump moves to install loyalists MORE was forced out and replaced by Mike PompeoMichael (Mike) Richard PompeoMore money at the gas pump may be the price of pressuring Iran The Hill's Morning Report - Dem candidates sell policy as smart politics Kim to meet with Putin as tensions with US rise MORE, whose departure as head of the CIA led to Gina Haspel's appointment.

Trump is already on his third national security adviser with John Bolton.

Trump has also had two chiefs of staff and more than one head at the Homeland Security Department, Health and Human Services Department, Veterans Affairs Department and the Environmental Protection Agency.