Trump on prospect of Dems demanding his tax returns: 'They can do whatever they want'

President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump reversed course on flavored e-cigarette ban over fear of job losses: report Trump to award National Medal of Arts to actor Jon Voight Sondland notified Trump officials of investigation push ahead of Ukraine call: report MORE on Monday downplayed the possibility that Democrats could demand his tax returns if they retake control of the House in Tuesday's elections.

"I don’t care. They can do whatever they want and I can do whatever I want," Trump said when asked if he was concerned Democrats may go after his tax returns if they win the majority.

Trump spoke to reporters upon arriving in Fort Wayne, Ind., for one of three campaign rallies he was set to hold on Monday. He suggested that a Democratic majority would force the White House to "have to work a little bit differently."

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"It'll all work out but I don't think that's going to happen," Trump said, expressing confidence in Republicans' chances on Tuesday. "I think we're doing very well in the House. I think we're doing very well in the Senate." 

Democrats and critics of the president have suggested that Trump's tax returns could reveal potential conflicts of interest, and liberal groups have urged Democratic lawmakers to demand the president's filings should they regain control of the House.

House Minority Leader Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiSchumer calls on Trump to testify as part of impeachment inquiry Sunday shows — Spotlight shifts to Sondland ahead of impeachment inquiry testimony Perception won't be reality, once AI can manipulate what we see MORE (D-Calif.) said last month that compelling Trump to turn over his tax returns would be "one of the first things we’d do" if Democrats win back the House majority.

Under federal tax law, the chairmen of congressional tax committees can request tax returns from the Treasury Department and review them in a closed session before voting to make all or parts of the returns public.

While Trump may protest such a request, the decision would ultimately fall to Treasury Secretary Steven MnuchinSteven Terner MnuchinLawmakers skeptical of progress on spending deal as wall battle looms Trump to tour Apple factory with Tim Cook on Wednesday The Hill's Morning Report — Public impeachment drama resumes today MORE.

Mnuchin told The New York Times earlier this month that he would work with the department's general counsel and the general counsel for the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) to address any requests should Democrats win the House.

The president broke with decades of precedent when he opted not to release his tax returns during the 2016 presidential campaign. 

The White House has repeatedly brushed off questions about releasing Trump's taxes after the election, claiming the documents were under audit and therefore could not be made public. Financial experts, reporters and lawmakers have noted that the president could still request that they be released.

Calls for Trump to release his returns intensified following a New York Times report that cited records and interviews indicating the president engaged in "dubious" tax practices to shield income from his father’s real estate empire from taxes. Trump and the White House blasted the story, though they did not refute specific claims.