FEATURED:

Trump: Candidates that did not embrace me can 'say goodbye'

Trump: Candidates that did not embrace me can 'say goodbye'
© Getty Images

President TrumpDonald John TrumpDeath toll in Northern California wildfire rises to 48: authorities Graham backs bill to protect Mueller Denham loses GOP seat in California MORE suggested early Wednesday that Republican candidates who did not embrace him in the midterm elections lost as a result, calling the final outcome a "very Big Win" despite the GOP losing control of the House and several governorships.

"Those that worked with me in this incredible Midterm Election, embracing certain policies and principles, did very well. Those that did not, say goodbye!" Trump tweeted.

"Yesterday was such a very Big Win, and all under the pressure of a Nasty and Hostile Media!" he added.

ADVERTISEMENT

The president provided a boost in the closing days of the campaign for Republican candidates that emerged victorious in a handful of key Senate races, including Josh Hawley of Missouri, Mike Braun of Indiana and incumbent Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzIncoming Dem lawmaker from Texas says Nielsen should be replaced as DHS chief Election Countdown: Lawsuits fly in Florida recount fight | Nelson pushes to extend deadline | Judge says Georgia county violated Civil Rights Act | Biden, Sanders lead 2020 Dem field in poll | Bloomberg to decide on 2020 by February Poll: Biden and Sanders lead 2020 Dem field, followed by Beto O'Rourke MORE (Texas). Ron DeSantisRonald Dion DeSantisSchumer tells Trump to stay out of Florida recount Rick Scott fundraises off Trump claim that Dems are trying to steal election Mika Brzezinski: McSally setting ‘far better example’ than ‘GOP men who will likely win’ MORE eked out a win in the gubernatorial race in Florida after Trump visited the state multiple times, and Republican Rick Scott appeared poised to win a Senate seat in the state as well.

However, several Trump-backed candidates were defeated on Tuesday, including Sen. Dean HellerDean Arthur HellerElection Countdown: Lawsuits fly in Florida recount fight | Nelson pushes to extend deadline | Judge says Georgia county violated Civil Rights Act | Biden, Sanders lead 2020 Dem field in poll | Bloomberg to decide on 2020 by February Sinema invokes McCain in Senate acceptance speech Sinema defeats McSally in Arizona Senate race MORE (R-Nev.) and GOP Senate nominees Patrick Morrisey (W.Va.), John James (Mich.) and Jim RenacciJames (Jim) B. RenacciTrump: Candidates that did not embrace me can 'say goodbye' The Hill's Morning Report — Split decision: Dems take House, GOP retains Senate majority Renacci swipes at Kasich after defeat for 'dividing the country' against Trump MORE (Ohio).

More than a dozen congressional and gubernatorial candidates Trump endorsed also lost their races, many of them incumbents. Among the casualties were Republican Reps. Rod Blum (Iowa), Pete SessionsPeter Anderson SessionsRepublicans must learn from the election mistake on immigration Marijuana was a big winner on Election Day Republicans express frustrations with campaign spending after midterm House losses MORE (Texas), Dave Brat (Va.), Claudia Tenney (N.Y.), and Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker (R).

While several of those congressional candidates were defeated in suburban districts where voters were apparently disillusioned with Trump, some representatives lost districts Trump carried in 2016.

In a separate tweet early Wednesday, the president claimed he received "so many congratulations" on "our Big Victory," including from foreign allies. 

"Received so many Congratulations from so many on our Big Victory last night, including from foreign nations (friends) that were waiting me out, and hoping, on Trade Deals. Now we can all get back to work and get things done!" Trump tweeted.

It's unclear which foreign leaders, if any, contacted Trump as midterm results poured in.

The president has been buoyant in his tweets reacting to Tuesday's results, calling it a "tremendous success" despite GOP losses in the House.

With 23 races still not officially decided, Democrats have won 219 seats and Republicans have won 193, enough to secure a Democratic majority for the next two years. The House majority gives the party subpoena and investigatory power, posing potential headaches for the White House.

The GOP padded its Senate majority on Tuesday, picking up three seats with races in Arizona and Montana still too close to call. The additional GOP Senate seats could provide a cushion for Trump to get his Cabinet appointees and judicial nominees confirmed.

Trump said in a later tweet that he would be discussing "our success" in the midterms during a news conference on Wednesday morning.

— This report was updated at 7:43 a.m.