Manchin: We're 'on the verge' of a constitutional crisis due to Sessions's firing

Sen. Joe ManchinJoseph (Joe) ManchinSenate rejects government-wide ban on abortion funding Centrist efforts to convince Trump to end shutdown falter Bipartisan group of senators will urge Trump to reopen government for 3 weeks MORE (D-W.Va.) said Thursday that the U.S. is on the "verge" of a constitutional crisis because of the forced resignation of Attorney General Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsOvernight Health Care: Thousands more migrant children may have been separated | Senate rejects bill to permanently ban federal funds for abortion | Women's March to lobby for 'Medicare for All' Acting AG Whitaker's wife defends him in lengthy email to journalist Watchdog: Thousands more migrant children separated from parents than previously known MORE

"I think it’s a big mistake to let Sessions go," Manchin, who was the only Democratic senator to vote to confirm the former attorney general, said on "CBS This Morning."

Manchin pointed to the potential ramifications Sessions's ouster could have on special counsel Robert MuellerRobert Swan MuellerSasse: US should applaud choice of Mueller to lead Russia probe MORE's investigation into Russia's election interference to back up his claim. 

His comments came just a day after Sessions formally resigned from his role at the Department of Justice at President TrumpDonald John TrumpDACA recipient claims Trump is holding ‘immigrant youth hostage’ amid quest for wall Lady Gaga blasts Pence as ‘worst representation of what it means to be Christian’ We have a long history of disrespecting Native Americans and denying their humanity MORE's request. Trump announced on Twitter on Wednesday that Matthew Whitaker, Sessions's chief of staff, will serve as acting attorney general. 

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Whitaker, who has publicly criticized certain elements of the Mueller investigation, will now oversee it.

Deputy Attorney General Rod RosensteinRod Jay Rosenstein5 myths about William Barr William Barr's only 'flaw' is that he was nominated by Trump The Hill's Morning Report — Shutdown fallout — economic distress MORE had been overseeing the probe since Sessions recused himself in early 2017. 

Democratic lawmakers, including Manchin, have criticized Whitaker's oversight of the Mueller probe.

"What raises my concerns is a person that's been so vocal against the investigation that was going on is [put] in charge a day after the [midterm] election," Manchin told CBS. "I think that gives concern to every senator, Democrat and Republican. We are a country — the rule of law is everything.

"Looking like it's been tilted one way or the other is wrong."

Trump has repeatedly called the Russia investigation a "witch hunt," and on Wednesday said that he could fire everyone in Mueller's office if he wanted. He said he would not take that step for political reasons, however.