Whitaker saying he won’t cut Mueller funding: report

Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker has told associates that he won't reduce special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) MuellerCNN's Toobin warns McCabe is in 'perilous condition' with emboldened Trump CNN anchor rips Trump over Stone while evoking Clinton-Lynch tarmac meeting The Hill's 12:30 Report: New Hampshire fallout MORE's budget, as he previously suggested, a source told Bloomberg. 

Whitaker, who took over the role last week when former Attorney General Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsSessions accepts 'Fox News Sunday' invitation to debate, Tuberville declines What you need to know about FBI official Dana Boente's retirement Rosenstein steps back into GOP crosshairs MORE was ousted, has reportedly said he will allow Mueller's investigation into Russian interference to move forward. His appointment raised alarms among Democrats and a few Republicans who expressed concern about his past statements about the investigation.

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Whitaker has come under scrutiny since his appointment for opinion pieces he wrote for The Hill and CNN advocating for curbing the scope of the Mueller investigation, and suggesting stifling its funding. He penned both pieces prior to joining the Department of Justice as chief of staff to Sessions.

Skeptics of any such effort by Whitaker to cut funding have noted that Mueller's budget for fiscal year 2019 has already been approved.

President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump says inviting Russia to G7 'a question of common sense' Pentagon chief does not support invoking Insurrection Act Dershowitz: Does President Trump have power to declare martial law? MORE fired Sessions last week and named Whitaker as his temporary replacement. Democrats and legal experts have questioned the legality of Whitaker's appointments, noting that he was not confirmed by the Senate and questioning his qualifications.

Rep. Jerrold Nadler (D-N.Y.), likely the incoming chairman of the House Judiciary Committee, signaled on Sunday he would call on Whitaker to appear before lawmakers to answer questions about his appointment.

“Our very first witness on — after Jan. 3 — we will subpoena ... or we will summon — if necessary, subpoena, Mr. Whitaker,” Nadler said on CNN’s “State of the Union.”

Rep. Adam SchiffAdam Bennett SchiffFlynn urged Russian diplomat to have 'reciprocal' response to Obama sanctions, new transcripts show The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - George Floyd's death sparks protests, National Guard activation Hillicon Valley: Trump signs order targeting social media legal protections | House requests conference with Senate after FISA vote canceled | Minneapolis systems temporarily brought down by hackers MORE (D-Calif.), the expected chairman of the House Intelligence Committee in the next session of Congress, added in a separate interview on Sunday that Democrats will hold Whitaker accountable if he attempts to interfere with the Mueller investigation at all.